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Syracuse head coach Boeheim declines comment on closing of Fine investigation

first_imgABOARD USS MIDWAY, SAN DIEGO, Calif. — One day after prosecutors announced former Syracuse associate head coach Bernie Fine won’t be charged in the criminal investigation of child-molesting allegations, his long-time boss, Jim Boeheim, declined to comment.After a 13-minute press conference in the media tent on the flight deck of the USS Midway, the last question was directed at Boeheim and asked if he had any comment or reaction to Friday’s news. The Syracuse head coach simply shook his head and brushed the question aside.“No,” Boeheim said. “No.”Boeheim and the Orange begin their season on Sunday in the Battle on the Midway against San Diego State at 1 p.m. PST. It will be the first full season in 35 years without Bernie Fine as a member of the Syracuse coaching staff. AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Comments Published on November 10, 2012 at 5:07 pm Contact Michael: [email protected] | @Michael_Cohen13 Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Super Bowl 53: Bayer Leverkusen mocks low-scoring game

first_imgLeverkusen took the chance to mock the NFL, with association soccer often criticized for lacking goals.”SoCcER iS a LoW-sCoRiNg sPoRt,” the Bundesliga club wrote on Twitter, inspired by the SpongeBob meme.SoCcER iS a LoW-sCoRiNg sPoRt— Bayer 04 Leverkusen (@bayer04_en) February 4, 2019The Rams answered the Patriots’ field goal with one of their own as the teams finished the third quarter tied at 3-3. Bayer Leverkusen poked fun at the low-scoring Super Bowl 53 between the Patriots and Rams.The Patriots led the Rams 3-0 at halftime in Atlanta in the second-lowest scoring first half in Super Bowl history.last_img

Indians removing Chief Wahoo logo from game uniforms in 2019

first_imgSlow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises View comments Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Read Next NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers The fight over Wahoo has spanned decades in Cleveland.Every year, groups of Native Americans and their supporters have protested outside the stadium before the home opener in hopes of not only getting the team to abolish Chief Wahoo but to change the Indians’ nickname, which they feel is an offensive depiction of their race.Those dissenting voices have been met with fans devoted to preserving Chief Wahoo’s place in team history. The Indians’ resurgence in the mid-1990s helped spur a downtown renaissance in Cleveland.The NFL’s Washington Redskins have come under similar fire to change their logo and nickname but so far have resisted. Last year, a Supreme Court ruling in another case cleared the way for the Redskins to preserve the trademark on its logo. Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting MOST READ LATEST STORIES FILE – In this June 19, 2017 file photo, members of the Cleveland Indians wear uniforms featuring mascot Chief Wahoo as they stand on the field for the national anthem before a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles in Baltimore. The Cleveland Indians are taking the divisive Chief Wahoo logo off their jerseys and caps, starting in 2019. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)CLEVELAND — Divisive and hotly debated, the Chief Wahoo logo is being removed from the Cleveland Indians’ uniform next year.The polarizing mascot is coming off the team’s jersey sleeves and caps starting in the 2019 season, a move that will end Chief Wahoo’s presence on the field but may not completely silence those who deem it racist.ADVERTISEMENT “Nonetheless, the club ultimately agreed with my position that the logo is no longer appropriate for on-field use in Major League Baseball, and I appreciate Mr. Dolan’s acknowledgement that removing it from the on-field uniform by the start of the 2019 season is the right course.”Under growing pressure to eliminate Chief Wahoo, the club has been transitioning away from the logo in recent years. The Indians introduced a block “C″ insignia on some of their caps and have removed signs with the Wahoo logo in and around Progressive Field, the team’s downtown ballpark.National criticism and scrutiny about the Indians’ allegiance to Chief Wahoo grew in 2016, when the Indians made the World Series and Manfred expressed his desire to have the team eradicate the symbol. Earlier in that postseason, a lawsuit was filed while the club was playing in Toronto to have the logo and team name banned from appearing on Canadian TV. That court case was dismissed by a judge.The Indians’ bid to host the 2019 All-Star Game, which it was ultimately awarded, further heightened debate over Wahoo.“We have consistently maintained that we are cognizant and sensitive to both sides of the discussion,” Dolan said. “While we recognize many of our fans have a long-standing attachment to Chief Wahoo, I’m ultimately in agreement with Commissioner Manfred’s desire to remove the logo from our uniforms in 2019.”ADVERTISEMENT Abueva finally shows up at Gilas practice John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles01:04Trump attends World Series baseball game in Washington DC00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC The Associated Press was informed of the decision before an official announcement was planned for Monday by Major League Baseball.After lengthy discussions between team owner Paul Dolan and MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred, the Indians are taking the extraordinary step of shelving the big-toothed, smiling, red-faced caricature, which has been used in used in various expressions by the team since 1947.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutHowever, the American League team will continue to wear the Wahoo logo on its uniform sleeves and caps in 2018, and the club will still sell merchandise featuring the mascot in Northeast Ohio. The team must maintain a retail presence so that MLB and the Indians can keep ownership of the trademark.“Major League Baseball is committed to building a culture of diversity and inclusion throughout the game,” Manfred said in a statement. “Over the past year, we encouraged dialogue with the Indians organization about the club’s use of the Chief Wahoo logo. During our constructive conversations, Paul Dolan made clear that there are fans who have a longstanding attachment to the logo and its place in the history of the team.last_img read more

We are improving, will be our best against Australia: Dhoni

first_imgIndia skipper Mahendra Singh Dhoni on Sunday admitted that losing quick wickets was still a concern but said his team was gradually improving and will be at its best against Australia in the World Cup quarterfinals in Ahmedabad on Thursday.India, who had lost nine wickets for just 29 runs against South Africa in their last outing, on Sunday slipped from 218 for three to 268 all out.”It (losing wickets) is a concern. But there is a gradual improvement (from seven for 29 to seven for 50) I am sure we will be at our best in the quarters. That’s the positive I will take out of this,” Dhoni said after India beat West Indies by 80 runs here.Dhoni said the turning point of the match was the wicket of opener Devon Smith, who was dismissed by pacer Zaheer Khan in the 31st over to trigger a collapse.”The game really changed once Zaheer gave us the breakthrough, until then Devon was batting really well. After that we could put pressure on both sides, and got more wickets than we needed and seize the game in the end,” Dhoni said.Asked about their quarterfinal match against Australia, Dhoni said they are focusing on the preparation rather than thinking about the result.”Australia are a very strong side and very expressive on the field. But it’s about how we prepare. Preparation is very important and we are just thinking about that particular day and match rather than think about the result,” he said.”Being in the present is a better option that thinking of the past or worrying about the future,” he added.advertisementMan of the Match Yuvraj Singh, who battled stomach cramps to score 113 runs and took two crucial wickets, said he was happy with the way he was middling the ball.”It’s been good, I went in and was middling the ball, so happy with the way it went. When you lose early wickets, you need a partnership going. Me and Virat took us to 220, very happy with the way it went,” he said.”I was getting stomach cramps since morning, but I wanted to bat till the end. I am Very happy with the team effort today. We have our batting plans. Our batting is going well, once we get the bowling and fielding going we should be ok.Asked about the quarterfinals match against Australia, Yuvraj said,”Australia have won five matches, we have also won five matches, so looking forward to the contest.” .West Indies skipper Darren Sammy said though they lost the match, there first objective of reaching the quarterfinals have been achieved.”We reached our first objective of reaching the knockout stage and we have to tighten our games quickly and produce our A game to beat Pakistan in the quarterfinals,” Sammy said.Sammy said he was happy with the bowling but said batting has let them down.”Rampaul was really good in his first game. He bowled tremendously, our bowing game good something which many felt were not our strong point. But we lost seven wickets in 30 odd runs and that is a concern,” he said.West Indies had beaten Bangladesh by nine wickets after bowling out the hosts for just 58 runs and Sammy hoped that they will carry the same confidence when they play in Dhaka on Wednesday.”We did well against Bangladesh at Dhaka and hopefully we will have the same confidence going in there on Wednesday,” he said.Sammy also hoped that injured players Kemar Roach and Chris Gayle will be fit for the match against Pakistan.”Knowing their commitment, I hope they will hopefully come out and give their best for West Indies,” he said.-With PTI inputslast_img read more

The Indian fan is acutely embarrassed every four years by the resounding absence of India from the World Cup

first_imgDressed in the team jersey, footballfans in Kolkata cheer for their favourite team, BrazilYou’ve got to love India for the way it loves football. There is no Indian team in the World Cup; and yet, for many Indians, life has ground to a delicious halt for the month-long duration of,Dressed in the team jersey, footballfans in Kolkata cheer for their favourite team, BrazilYou’ve got to love India for the way it loves football. There is no Indian team in the World Cup; and yet, for many Indians, life has ground to a delicious halt for the month-long duration of the tournament. Unlike in 2006-when Vikash Dhorasoo, a Mauritian descended from Andhra labourers indentured in the 19th century, made his improbable way on to the roster of France-there isn’t a single player of Indian origin in any of the 32 squads on view in Brazil.Amid the legions of naturalised players representing countries other than the ones in which they (or their parents) were born, there are Congolese players playing for Belgium, Albanians for Switzerland, Jamaicans for England, Turks for Germany, Surinamese for The Netherlands, Senegalese for France, Guinea-Bissauans for Portugal, Icelanders for the United States.But there is no ethnic Indian in sight- on any team, from anywhere-even though there can scarcely be a country where Indians have not settled in numbers. And yet, India is agog, watching the World Cup through late nights and early mornings with a passion that is truly impressive, even slightly mad. At an emotional and spiritual level, this should make Indians a special people. At least with regard to football, we are not narrow nationalists. I wanted to set up a business call with a colleague in Delhi and he pleaded, “Please, no, not then, I’ll be watching Colombia.” This was a country in which the man in question had never set foot, whose music (I can reliably state) he’d never heard, whose language he does not speak, and yet…missing even a small part of the game mattered. Colombia mattered because Colombia was playing football in the World Cup, and that was that. There is a purity of devotion in the heart of the Indian football aficionado that comes from being unsullied by merely patriotic impulses. This is what makes the Indian football fan so much more noble than the Indian cricket fan, who cares only for the Indian cricket team (a victorious Indian cricket team, preferably), and who would rather die a slow death than watch New Zealand play Sri Lanka, or England play South Africa.advertisementEvery four years, when the football World Cup starts to sizzle, Indian fans are faced with a question that fans in Brazil or England, Argentina or The Netherlands, do not ever face: Who to support? Not for Indians the electric pleasure of watching their team emerge from the tunnel, hair gelled, chins astubble, chests puffed with pride as the national anthem plays out to the world. Not for Indians the delight of having strangers from other lands come up to them, mouthing (and mangling) the names of Indian players in gestures of admiration and fandom. Not for Indians the panning of the cameras to Indian sections of a World Cup crowd, alighting on the faces of lovely Indian girls, painted Indian diehard fans, troops of men beating Indian drums. India, a billion-strong, is absent from the spectacle. We had a chance to be a part of all this, in 1950, when the Indian team was invited to the last World Cup held in Brazil. But the men who ran the Indian football federation, to their eternal damnation, chose not to send a team that would likely have acquitted itself well. They deemed the damage to their precious budgets to be too high.India-and Indian football-has been paying for that shortsightedness, that cosmic niggardliness, forever after. Those were years when India was the India of global under-confidence, of an inward-looking provincialism, when competition was frowned upon by the elites who governed the country. This aversion to competition afflicted our business, our industry, our trade… our football. And now that we are ready to compete with the world, we find that we cannot, except in those areas where we have a special advantage, such as cricket, with its small field of countries against which the game might be played.We are still appalling at most truly global competitions: Our universities aren’t world-class; our scientific R&D is mediocre, as is our defence technology; our industries are uncompetitive; our military fit for battle only against paltry Pakistan (and China knows this); our diplomats can barely speak English (let alone Russian or Arabic)… and our football team is ranked 154th in the world, one place above Singapore, one place behind Malaysia.But our football fans should be ranked close to, or at, No. 1, for they are the closest one gets to the platonic ideal of a football-lover. Not wedded to a team by blood or flag, they pick their favourites independently. An Indian family might have a father who supports Brazil, a son who shouts for a Spain, a daughter who swoons for Italy, a mother who admires Argentina. Brazil has long been an Indian passion, in part because its players play the game with such rollicking panache, but also because there is a sense that Brazil, somehow, is like India: A big, unruly, Third World country with colossal income disparity and cities seething with slums. It helps, perhaps, that some Brazilians even look a bit like us. But when we look at their football crowds, and their women, we know that there are few countries in the world that are as unlike India as Brazil. We gape at their sexual frankness, their startlingly different moral codes, and we know that all comparisons, all likenesses, have limits.advertisementIn the end, what the Indian fan looks for in a World Cup team is not an echo of himself or his country, but a history of excellence and a recognisable sporting idiom that appears to transcend national boundaries. Brazil plays football in a way that invites the whole world to watch. Recent Spanish teams have played that way, too, as have some of the more successful Argentine sides of the modern era. England, by contrast, and Germany (or, to be fair, the Germany of about 10 years ago) have both been teams that tailor their appeal to their own compatriots. Flair is an important part of global appeal, efficiency and grit less so. Which is not to say that Indian fans aren’t quietly envious of people from countries that aren’t in the top tier, and yet, by sheer dint of effort, send teams to World Cups: Costa Rica. Algeria. Greece. Bosnia and Herzegovina. South Korea. United States. Honduras. Iran.For the truth is that the Indian fan is acutely embarrassed every four years by the resounding absence of India from the World Cup, even as he is exhilarated by the matches between old favourites. Just as players from other lands are household names in his own country, the Indian fan yearns for the day when Indian players will command global attention, serving as better ambassadors for India than the legions of suits in embassies around the world. Watching football is a complex business when the World Cup comes around. We are uplifted by the play we see, by the rugged beauty on display. But we also feel very small as we watch, a nation cut down to size.Tunku Varadarajan is a fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institutionlast_img read more

UST’s depleted state fuels Eya Laure ahead of UAAP Final Four

first_imgPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMANILA, Philippines—University of Santo Tomas finished the elimination round of the UAAP Season 81 women’s volleyball tournament with a 10-4 record which is currently the third best team in the ladder.The Golden Tigresses also returned the Final Four after missing the Season 80 semifinals despite having a depleted team.ADVERTISEMENT Star rookie Eya Laure, though, treats her team’s limited lineup as a source of motivation for UST’s semifinals matchup against defending champion De La Salle.“I’ll use their absences as a motivation because it’s also a factor and I wish that they’re here with us, but here we are,” said Laure in Filipino after UST’s win over National University, 27-25, 25-17, 20-25, 25-16, Saturday at Filoil Flying V Center.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsSeason 80 Rookie of the Year Milena Alessandrini played just four games for the Golden Tigresses after suffering a torn anterior cruciate ligament in her left knee while middle blocker Tin Francisco is also out with the same injury.There’s also Laure’s older sister and Season 77 Rookie of the Year EJ Laure, who sat out Seasons 80 and 81 due to injuries. MOST READ DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:30PNP officials inspect Cubao bus terminals ahead of Undas02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Philippine Arena Interchange inaugurated SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Duterte wants probe of SEA Games messcenter_img Warriors prepare for rested James Harden, Rockets in West rematch Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power grid Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES “This season is for Ate Sisi (Rondina), the coaching staff who’s always supported us, and for those who always believed in us,” said Laure. “This is also for Ate Milena, Ate Tin.”Laure added she wants to help UST rise from a dismal Season 80 campaign wherein the Golden Tigresses finished seventh with a 4-10 card.“Last season everyone was really downtrodden and it pains me to see it because I see all the hard work and sacrifices,” said Laure, who didn’t play for two UAAP seasons due to the implementation of the K-12 education system.Laure, despite not playing in the UAAP for Seasons 79 and 80, still trained with the high school team in 2017 and 2018.“Before they took the floor, we were the ones who trained and I can see their hardships and how hard they get hurt,” said Laure.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassleslast_img read more