Monthly Archives: June 2021

Saracens unmasked!

first_imgMatch the fancy dress to the playerThe Saracens squad got together for a team shot with a difference in the January edition of Rugby World, published on 6 December. Can you tell who’s who? If you need a little help we’ve listed all the stars of the photo below…Back Row standing (L-R): Neil de Kock, Tom Jubb, Eoin Sheriff, Rhys Gill, Steve Borthwick, Ernst Joubert, Justin Melck, Kameli Ratuvou, John Smit, Michael Tagicakibau, Alex Goode, Charlie Hodgson, Matt HankinMiddle Row standing (L-R): Nils Mordt, Hayden Smith, Jackson Wray, Mako Vunipola, Jamie George, Deon Carstens, Chris Wyles, David Strettle, Hugh Vyvyan, Rodd Penney, (On the Bike – James Short, Luke Baldwin, Duncan Taylor) Kelly Brown, Schalk Brits, Jacques Burger Front Row lying Down (L-R): George Kruis, Jared Saunders, Jean-Baptiste Bruzulier Mouritz BothaPicture: Shaun Botterill – Getty Images LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Front Row Seated (L-R): Andy Saull, Brad Barritt, Owen Farrell, Will Fraser, Sam Stanley, Ben Spencer, Petrus du Plessis, Geoffrey Sella, Carlos Nieto, Matt Stevens, Harry Allen, Adam Powell,last_img read more

Tigers in three-way Heineken Cup tussle

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Stephen Ferris takes on the Tigers at Welford Road in NovemberWe are in for a treat this Friday night as two former European champions, Ulster and Leicester, lock horns at Ravenhill. The Heineken Pool 4 clash is a must-win game for both teams, the hosts currently sitting atop their group on 14 points and the Tigers just two behind them.Brian McLaughlin has been able to name a full-strength team, with fly-half Ian Humphreys and South African back-rower Pedrie Wannenburg both being declared fit to face the Premiership team. His side also features six Ireland internationals, including Stephen Ferris and Rory Best.In contrast, Richard Cockerill is without England internationals Toby Flood, Louis Deacon and Manu Tuilagi, who are replaced by Billy Twelvetrees, Geoff Parling and Anthony Allen. Parling was this week named in the England Saxons EPS, along with No 8 Thomas Waldrom.When Ulster visited Welford Road inNovember they were bullied up front, losing the game 20-9. It was a missed opportunity for the Belfast side, who were facing a Tigers side weakened by a number of injuries.Crucially, New Zealander John Afoa is available for Ulster this time – in November he had returned home for personal reasons. Alongside Tom Court and Best, he will take on Tigers Marcos Ayerza, Rob Hawkins and Martin Castrogiovanni in what promises to be a fierce battle.Leicester must win this game to be in with a chance of qualifying for the quarter-finals, although Rugby World’s pick to win this pool is Clermont, who currently lie in third place on 11 points. The French side travel to Aironi this weekend and host Ulster next, giving themselves the potential to pick up a further nine or ten points.The Tigers host Aironi next weekend, a game in which they are expected to pick up five points, but they may exit Ravenhill with nothing, leaving them on 17 points.While Ulster could pick up four points on Friday night, they will have a job on their hands to beat Clermont away in round six, and so are likely to finish on 18 points.We’ve given you our predictions but what do you think?Ulster team TAGS: Leicester TigersUlster 3 Leicester – 17 points4 Aironi – 0 points Stefan Terblanche; Andrew Trimble, Darren Cave, Paddy Wallace, Craig Gilroy; Ian Humphreys, Ruan Pienaar; Tom Court, Rory Best, John Afoa , Johann Muller , Dan Tuohy, Stephen Ferris, Chris Henry, Pedrie WannenburgReplacements: Nigel Brady, Callum Black, Adam Macklin, Lewis Stevenson, Willie Faloon, Paul Marshall, Ian Whitten, Adam D’ArcyTigers teamGeordan Murphy; Horacio Agulla, Matt Smith, Anthony Allen, Alesana Tuilagi; Billy Twelvetrees, Ben Youngs; Marcos Ayerza, Rob Hawkins, Martin Castrogiovanni, Steve Mafi, Geoff Parling, Tom Croft, Julian Salvi, Thomas WaldromReplacements: George Chuter, Boris Stankovich, Dan Cole, Ed Slater, Ben Woods, Sam Harrison, Jeremy Staunton, Scott HamiltonRugby World’s predicted Pool 4 finish1 Clermont – 19 points2 Ulster – 18 pointslast_img read more

Priestland and Roberts fit for Ireland game

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “We have been able to retain continuity in some key areas, we have been working hard and we feel we are approaching this match with the right attitude and with some good preparation work done,” said Gatland.“We are two sides who know each other well, Ireland will not have enjoyed losing to us in New Zealand, they will want to redress the balance in Dublin this weekend, but they will find us in just as determined mood.”WALES TEAM TO PLAY IRELAND AT AVIVA STADIUM ON SUNDAY 5 FEBRUARY, KICK-OFF 3pm Leigh Halfpenny; Alex Cuthbert, Jonathan Davies, Jamie Roberts, George North; Rhys Priestland, Mike Phillips; Rhys Gill, Huw Bennett, Adam Jones, Bradley Davies, Ian Evans, Ryan Jones, Sam Warburton (capt), Toby Faletau.Replacements: Ken Owens, Paul James, Andy Powell, Justin Tipuric, Lloyd Williams, James Hook, Scott Williams Back at the races: Rhys Priestland and Jamie Roberts are fit for Wales’ game against IrelandRHYS PRIESTLAND and Jamie Roberts have been selected in the Wales team to play Ireland in their opening RBS 6 Nations game on Sunday.Fly-half Priestland and centre Roberts, who both impressed for Wales at the World Cup, had been struggling with knee injuries but have recovered in time to earn starting berths.Cardiff Blues wing Alex Cuthbert replaces Shane Williams in Wales’ back three, although it is George North who will wear the famous No 11 shirt with Leigh Halfpenny retained at full-back.New prop: Saracens’ Rhys Gill comes in for Gethin JenkinsRhys Gill comes into the front row in place of injured prop Gethin Jenkins. The Saracens loosehead will win his second cap in Dublin and will have a big task to get the better of Ireland’s Mike Ross at scrum time, but he does have experienced heads Adam Jones and Huw Bennett, who will win his 50th cap, alongside him.Dan Lydiate hasn’t recovered from his ankle injury and his place at blindside is taken by former Wales captain Ryan Jones.Ireland will be looking to gain revenge for their two recent defeats by Wales – a controversial Mike Phillips try giving the Welsh victory in Cardiff in last year’s Six Nations as well as that comprehensive win by the men in red in the World Cup quarter-final in Wellington. But Wales coach Warren Gatland insists his team are up for the challenge. NOT FOR FEATURED last_img read more

Weekend’s rugby talking points

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS As another weekend of domestic action prepares to kick off, RW takes a look at some of the key talking points that could shape this weekend’s Premiership and Pro12 action Bowe and Jones have ground to make up in their national shirts. Bowe, through long-standing injury problems, has work to do to usurp Dave Kearney from the Ireland shirt, while Jones is working his way back to fitness after a troubled summer where he was hooked before half-time against South Africa in the Second Test and then found himself without a club until August after well-documented club v country problems. In slightly fine fettle are Cuthbert, who was a man possessed in the Second Test in South Africa and has started off the season confidently, crossing the whitewash against Treviso and Matthew Rees who has been rolling back the years and said he’s even ‘surprised himself’ in how he has returned from testicular cancer. As for Best, his leadership qualities are even more in demand an Ulster side that has had its fair share of turbulence over the summer. Those subplots will be fascinating to watch…Lion’s pride: Tommy Bowe will be one of five Lions looking to make a mark this evening Fly-half showdown: Bath’s George Ford is set for a highly-anticipated clash with Leicester’s Freddie Burns center_img Keys for No. 10…Such is the intensity of the Bath v Leicester rivalry that matches between the two sides carry a health warning as it is, but this weekend’s clash has an extra special element. The tactical tussle between George Ford and Freddie Burns is a tantalising prospect, pitting two of England’s in-form No. 10’s against each other just a year out from a World Cup in which both will be jostling to play a role. Ford’s second season in Bath colours has started in a measured, yet promising fashion. His ability to play flat and ability to bring others into the game are well-documented, and he will be keen to showcase those gifts against his former employers, but last weekend’s kicking display also answered some critics of his abilities from the tee.For his part, Burns has seized the 10 shirt at Leicester with both hands since hooking up after an underwhelming final season with Gloucester. The maturity of his display at Exeter last weekend was met with plaudits and was a major factor in the Tigers’ victory. The battle at the breakdown and line-speeds of both backlines will  have a large say on the outcome, yet whoever comes out on top between Ford and Burns could prove pivotal.Burning ambition: Leicester’s Burns will be hoping to get one over on his opposite numberBattle of the backrows: Chris Robshaw v James HaskellChris Robshaw and James Haskell had wildly contrasting fortunes in Round 2. Whilst the former’s consisted of regrouping his side under the posts as Saracens collected points at will, the latter played a captain’s role in Wasps 20-16 downing of the champions. However Robshaw has a chance to atone for his side’s capitulation against an upbeat Wasps side.Physically, the two are evenly matched and both are influential leaders, Robshaw has only recently been stood down from his captaincy at Quins so as not to overburden him in a World Cup year, whilst Haskell holds the talisman position for Wasps, a role he played effectively against Saints. Wasps line-breaker Ashley Johnson will start on the bench, so Haskell’s role in nullifying the Quins back-row will be heightened. The collisions could be seismic. Explosive: Haskell will have to be on his best form when he clashes with England rival RobshawIrish’s different European stories When the final whistle went on Connacht’s momentous 16-14 Heineken Cup victory over Toulouse last year, the European profile of the ‘fourth’ Irish province was given a shot of adrenalin. After all, they were competing in the prestigious tournament for just the third time,  this came as they were bottom of the Pro12 at the time. Yet back in 2011, when the Galway-based club were appearing in Europe’s premier tournament for the first time, they had this weekend’s opponents to thank for lunching at the top table.Leinster’s three Heineken titles in a four-year period included success in 2011, and that victory resulted in Connacht’s qualification for the following year’s tournament. Fast-forward to 2014, and it is the hosts who have sprung out of the traps fastest, sitting atop of the Pro12 ladder with back-to-back wins. Leinster will be intent on ensuring that run comes to an end at the Sportsground, but Connacht will go into the game with no inferiority complex and without needing their provincial rivals to give them a leg up anymore.Lam-bition: Connacht head coach Pat Lam will be hoping that his side can continue their fine start to the seasonLions out to prove a point…There will be no less than five British and Irish Lions on the pitch at kick-off when Cardiff and Ulster clash in the Pro12 tonight. In the Blues corner, are Matthew Rees, Adam Jones, Alex Cuthbert, while in white are Rory Best and Tommy Bowe who have worn the coveted Lions jersey. All five have differing reasons for wanting to make a mark.last_img read more

2019 Rugby World Cup: Argentina 28-12 Tonga

first_img 2019 Rugby World Cup: Argentina 28-12 Tonga Head-to-headPlayed – 2Argentina wins – 2Tonga wins – 0Did You Know?The Pumas secured the fastest bonus point of this World Cup, scoring their fourth try in the 27th minute (South Africa eclipsed this later in the day against Namibia).They ended their record worst-ever run of ten straight defeats.Agustín Creevy equalled Felipe Contepomi’s Argentina caps record of 87 when coming on in the second half.Telusa Veainu’s double took him to four World Cup tries – a Tonga record.Related: Rugby World Cup FixturesIn a nutshellArgentina secured the bonus-point win they required to stay in the hunt for a top-two place in Pool C, but they were left with as many questions as answers after losing the second half 5-0 and going scoreless after the 27th minute.By that stage they had the game in their pocket after picking up the fastest try bonus of Japan 2019, with hooker Julian Montoya collecting three of the four tries. The Pumas had scored two tries from driving mauls against France and as Tonga prepared to repel an early lineout, Argentina worked a trick move in the 5m channel for Montoya to score.Ten minutes later he crashed over from an orthodox lineout drive and Tonga’s woes were compounded when James Faiva’s pass went loose and wing Santiago Carreras – a Test debutant last month – pounced to score his first international try. Tonga Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Now that is what you call a finish A wonderful offload from Vuna and an acrobatic finish from Veainu sees Tonga grab their second try #ARGvTGA #RWC2019 #ITVRugby pic.twitter.com/UowQb4toD3— ITV Rugby (@ITVRugby) September 28, 2019The reactionHat-trick hero Julian Montoya: “I’m really happy about how the team played. I’m really happy and really honoured to wear this jersey. This (Man of the Match award) is really nice, but the important thing is playing for Argentina and representing my country.”On being the leading try-scorer at RWC 2019: “Really? I didn’t know that. That’s something nice but the most important thing is playing for my country, my family, my friends, my girlfriend and all the people I care about. I want to make them proud of me.”Argentina captain Pablo Matera: “Against Tonga it’s always physical. We were physical as well and I’m happy we got the win.“The fans were amazing. Every place we go, you find Argentinians there. To everyone, thank you for being here and for believing in us.”Prayer meeting: Tonga players huddle after the match at Hanazono Rugby Stadium (Getty Images)Tonga coach Toutai Kefu on the Lavanini tackle incident: “I thought it was a try – I thought it was a shoulder charge. If we had got that we would have come out with a lot more belief and confidence. I looked at the front view. He did wrap his right arm and I think that’s why they probably got called off (for half-time). We play by the referee’s decision.“I thought there were a couple of 50-50s we didn’t get. It was critical for us. I’m used to it after four years of Tier Two. You move on.”“I thought it was a try. I thought it was a shoulder charge” Toutai KefuOn Tonga’s poor start: “The start was just errors – poor skill, bit of miscommunication. Typical Tier Two errors. But we never gave up. We could have thrown the white flag up but the boys dug in. It shows their character.”Tonga captain Siale Piutau: “You can’t let Tier One teams get a head start like that. We gifted them two tries and that’s the make or break of the game.“But I’m proud of how we fronted up physically. We improved our physicality from last week and wanted to bring that into this game, but we brought it just a bit late in the second half.”Far-reaching: Sione Kalamafoni soars above Argentina but Tonga were again left licking their woundsThe TeamsArgentina: Emiliano Boffelli; Matías Moroni, Matias Orlando (Bautista Delguy 66), Jeronimo de la Fuente, Santiago Carreras; Benjamin Urdapilleta (Nicolás Sanchez 54), Tomas Cubelli (Felipe Ezcurra 73); Nahuel Tetaz Chaparro (Mayco Vivas 44), Julian Montoya (Agustín Creevy 44), Juan Figallo (Santiago Medrano 44), Guido Petti, Tomas Lavanini (Matias Alemanno 54), Pablo Matera (capt, Javier Ortega Desio 44), Marcos Kremer, Tomas Lezana.Tries: Montoya 3 (6, 16, 27), Carreras. Cons: Urdapilleta 4.Tonga: Telusa Veainu (Latiume Fosita 75); Viliami Lolohea (Cooper Vuna 42), Malietoa Hingano, Siale Piutau (capt, Cooper Vuna 13-23), David Halaifonua; James Faiva, Sonatane Takulua (Leon Fukofuka 65); Siegfried Fisi’ihoi (Vunipola Fifita 73), Paul Ngauamo (Sosefo Sakalia 52), Ben Tameifuna (Ma’afu Fia ht), Sam Lousi, Halaleva Fifita, Sione Kalamafoni (Sitiveni Mafi 65), Zane Kapeli (Nasi Manu 52), Maama Vaipulu.Tries: Veainu 2 (29, 65). Con: Takulua. Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Go to war on the field but the brotherhood is strong once that full time whistle goes. Good luck to @lospumasuar for the rest of the @rugbyworldcup. pic.twitter.com/CLwx9OxufR— Tonga Rugby Union (@officialTongaRU) September 28, 2019Having lifted the siege, Tonga got their second try when Veainu touched down brilliantly in the corner after a terrific back-door offload by Vuna. The islanders finished the game the stronger and will take belief into their clash against France.For Argentina, it was a case of job done and with no obvious injuries, Guido Petti collecting a late shoulder knock that appeared to be just a stinger. But they will need to raise their level much further to have a chance of beating England next weekend.Related: Rugby World Cup TV Coverage Argentina Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Los Pumas failed to make it to the… Hat-trick hero: Julian Montoya (left) celebrates scoring his first try for Argentina against Tonga (Getty) Collapse Julian Montoya’s hat-trick paves the way for an Argentina bonus-point win in Osaka Argentina Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Rugby World Cup Groups A long way back for Tonga Another handling error allows Argentina in and it’s Santiago Carreras who scores their third try Watch LIVE now @ITV https://t.co/1kERJeYFwh #ITVRugby #RWC2019 #ARGvTGA pic.twitter.com/1rXZQPMbJc— ITV Rugby (@ITVRugby) September 28, 2019When Montoya went over again on 27 minutes, after picking up from the ruck and charging over from ten metres, Argentina were out of sight at 28-0, Benjamin Urdapilleta having landed all four conversions.Tonga were guilty of some sloppy passing and, indeed, both sides struggled with their handling in the humid conditions. Unfortunately, the tournament is being dogged by a high number of handling errors, with fluid back play something of a rarity.Tonga struck their first blow when Leicester full-back Telusa Veainu finished skilfully, Sonatane Takulua’s conversion bringing up his double century of points for Tonga.Scoring return: Telusa Veainu (left) is congratulated after scoring Tonga’s second try (Getty Images)For once, there was no controversy over a high tackle in the match but right on half-time, Tonga wing David Halaifonua was bounced into touch in the corner by a robust challenge by Tomas Lavanini.Referee Jaco Peyper took a look at the replay and ruled that the Pumas lock had wrapped one arm in the tackle, but the team in the ITV studio were having none of it. “It was a token effort,” said Brian O’Driscoll, “that should have been a yellow card and a penalty try.”Controversial: David Halaifonua is forced out by a Tomas Lavanini tackle that some felt was illegal (Getty)The incident acquired greater significance as the match wore on. Argentina came away with nothing after a long spell of pressure in the third quarter, with Tomas Cubelli becoming the third Puma – after Marcos Kremer and Urdapilleta – to be denied a score after crossing the try-line. The scrum-half was thwarted by outstanding defence by Takulua. TAGS: Tonga Tonga Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Unlikely to proceed to the knockout stages, Tonga… Expand Rugby World Cup Groups Star manJulian Montoya was awarded Man of the Match and it would be churlish to disagree after his quick-fire hat-trick – he’s now scored six World Cup tries, four of them at this tournament.The 25-year-old hooker has only started seven of his 57 Tests and he gave way here just after half-time to the man who’s been in his way, the indomitable Agustín Creevy.Making history: Julian Montoya was the beneficiary of Argentina’s set-piece excellence (Getty Images)Montoya’s hat-trick is only the second by a hooker at a World Cup, after Keith Wood’s four against USA in 1999, and only the second by a Puma in the competition’s history. Martin Gallan bagged a treble against Namibia in 2003.Telusa Veainu, playing his first Test since 2016 following injury problems, should also be applauded for his expert finishing. His skills will be a huge boon to Tonga in the remainder of the tournament. Skipper Siale Piutau was another to shine. A rundown of the Rugby World Cup groups… Expand Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Scotland beat France in Paris for first time in 22 years

first_img Scotland beat France in Paris for first time in 22 yearsParis when it drizzles! This Six Nations finale at the Stade de France may not have been the end-to-end display of running rugby expected – the wet conditions playing their part – but it still delivered plenty of drama, as so many games in this year’s championship have.The match featured six tries, two sin-binnings and a red card, but it was the 20-plus phases leading to Duhan van der Merwe’s late score that stood out as Scotland beat France in Paris for the first time this century.The cheers at Scotland’s 27-23 victory were matched in Wales, as the fact France failed in their attempt to score four tries and win by 21 points mean it is Alun Wyn Jones’s side who lift the championship title.Related content: How Wales won the 2021 Six NationsHere’s how the game played out…Scotland beat France in Paris for first time in 22 yearsMidway through the first half Scotland led 10-3 thanks to a van der Merwe try and a conversion and penalty from Finn Russell.There were question marks over the winger’s try, which came following a five-metre lineout. George Turner broke from the maul first, then Hamish Watson made some ground before van der Merwe picked up and burrowed over. The French queried the score for a double movement but referee Wayne Barnes stuck with his decision. Late Duhan van der Merwe try delivers historic Six Nations victory Scotland wing Duhan van der Merwe (centre) celebrates his winning try (SNS Group/Getty Images) Scotland NEVER give up. Duhan van der Merwe scores with the very last play of the game to secure the win in Paris! #GuinnessSixNations #FRAvSCO pic.twitter.com/pIOEbgwbJD— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) March 26, 2021Adam Hastings added the final flourish with a conversion to leave Scots and Welsh united in delight. Despite their historic win, Scotland finish fourth in the table and dejected France take the runners-up spot behind the Welsh. The first score of the game goes to Scotland! Game on in Paris. #GuinnessSixNations #FRAvSCO pic.twitter.com/JDNa1HXIMd— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) March 26, 2021Scotland’s kicking game – and France’s attempts to run the ball out of their 22 – kept the hosts pinned in their own half for much of the first half-hour, but then momentum swung les Bleus’ way.The Scots conceded a succession of penalties and the pressure eventually told from a five-metre scrum. Gregory Alldritt broke from the back and fed Antoine Dupont, who sent a huge pass out to Damian Penaud. The wing stepped infield and offloaded to Brice Dulin to score in the corner. Romain Ntamack converted from the touchline to make it 13-10.Brice Dulin scores for France just before half-time after being put in by Damian Penaud, right (Inpho)Things got worse for Scotland before the half-time whistle when Stuart Hogg was sin-binned, a victim of repeated infringements by his team. From that penalty, Ntamack kicked to the corner but Nick Haining made a crucial intervention to steal the lineout.France got their second try early soon after the break – and it was a beauty. Dulin marked a kick in the French 22, then tapped and ran. Next came Ntamack and then Arthur Vincent, which took play to halfway.Virimi Vakatawa took the move on and produced a sublime offload to Penaud, who chipped ahead and touched down his own kick despite being felled by Ali Price. Barnes was due to award a penalty try for an off-the-ball tackle by Price had Penaud not already scored the try. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Penaud launched another attack from his own line in the 54th minute that saw Gael Fickou take play to the Scotland 22 but the visitors secured possession following a Dupont chip, were awarded a penalty and took play deep into the French half.Sam Johnson got close to scoring from a set lineout move but he was brought down a few metres from the posts. France then conceded a series of penalties and Scotland opted for a series of five-metre lineouts, which led to another David Cherry try.The hooker scored twice against Italy and crossed again in Paris. Scotland won ball at the back of the lineout, set the maul and as Swan Rebbadj ripped the ball it fell perfectly for Cherry, who darted over. Russell’s conversion gave Scotland a two-point lead.Hooker George Turner roars his approval as Scotland open up an early lead at Stade de France (inpho)Rebbadj was quick to make amends, finding a big gap to dive over from close range following a couple of lineouts close to the Scottish line. Ntamack missed the conversion, making it 23-20 going into the last 15 minutes.Scotland came again and opted for more lineouts rather than a kick at goal that would have drawn the scores level. It was to no avail as Russell was sent off in the 71st minute for leading with the forearm to the neck of tackler Dulin – the fifth red card in this year’s Six Nations.It was 14 men v 14 men for the closing minutes, however, as France’s penalty count grew too high and Baptiste Serin was the one shown yellow.Penalties were awarded this way and that as the match drew to a close, but it was the Scots who took the most advantage – kicking into France’s 22 and launching from their lineout once more. They showed great patience to go through more than 20 phases to eventually create the space for van der Merwe to cross out wide. TAGS: Highlight LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Lions squad analysis: Five talking points

first_imgUnclear on the opensideWith a squad demographic like this, everything points to a lock-six hybrid starting the Tests, which suddenly makes the openside flanker berth the battle to watch throughout the warm-up matches. A three-way race between Justin Tipuric, Tom Curry and Hamish Watson looms.Justin Tipuric and Tom Curry are in the mix for the Lions No 7 shirt (Visionhaus/Getty Images)Tipuric feels the most attacking option – with Gatland’s No 8 selections, the Lions could effectively step out onto the field for the first Test with four options at centre.Alternatively, if the coaches want a jackler, Curry is probably the selection, while his lineout ability means that he possibly has the best chance of shifting over to blindside if needed.However, if Gatland is looking for pure physicality – Watson has to be the bet. Running into the Edinburgh openside looks like accidentally getting trapped in an industrial car wash, where his victims emerge bruised, dazed and foaming at the mouth. According to Opta, his 92% tackle success rate places him second in world rugby. Lions squad analysis: Five talking pointsThe 2021 British & Irish Lions squad announcement did not lack for drama. With the task of choosing five talking points roughly akin to being the fact-checker for a Donald Trump speech, where to start?!Centres of national defenceBundee Aki, Chris Harris and Robbie Henshaw were the specialist centres named in the squad, with perhaps only Henshaw feeling assured of selection beforehand. Casualties included the subtler options of Jonathan Davies, Garry Ringrose and Henry Slade, with Manu Tuilagi probably an injury away.It seems that Warren Gatland is happy to look at Owen Farrell and Elliot Daly as midfield options, with both Saracens clearly benefiting from their versatility rather than Six Nations form.This is a departure from the Lions’ previous two tours to South Africa, which saw  Jeremy Guscott and Brian O’Driscoll as the Test centres – two options silkier than Persian pyjamas.However, you suspect that Gatland has been obsessively watching the 2019 World Cup final, still the last game South Africa played. The Springboks scored both tries by exploiting Lukhanyo Am’s channel with quick hands and skipping through the cover defence.To try to combat this, Gatland may not necessarily have picked the best centres in Britain and Ireland but he has picked the best defenders. With the clash of forwards expected to eat up defenders, Harris and Henshaw are able to cover a vast span of metreage on the edge – an absolute necessity with two Tests on the hard and hot turf of the Highveld.Round, not through These wide channels will be fascinating, with Gatland’s choice of No 8s also informed by this tactical battleground.While you might not look at his centres and think of raw incision, the 15m line is the seam where Taulupe Faletau, Sam Simmonds and Jack Conan really thrive. Think of the chosen three as third centres in attack, with the raw pace, size and offloading ability to challenge the athleticism of Am and Damian de Allende.They have not been picked to go toe-to-toe with Duane Vermeulen over the sponsor’s logo, in the manner that a Billy Vunipola or CJ Stander might have been expected to. That is a really difficult, painful and, quite frankly, barmy way to attack the Springboks.Instead of expecting to beat farm machinery in the contact area, a far easier way to make metres is to go round them, possibly even trying to create a mismatch with South Africa’s smaller wingers. Faletau, Simmonds and Conan will be asked to find weak outside shoulders, to ride tackles and flick passes back inside.This has worked for Gatland before – Faletau’s crucial score against New Zealand in 2017 is a perfect example. Just as Gatland has picked his best wide defenders at centre, he has picked his best wide attackers at No 8. Or Louis Rees-Zammit, the youngest Lion since 1959, and Duhan van der Merwe, returning to South Africa as a Lion less than a year after his international debut.There will be more fairytales to be written. Air-raid squadron in the back fiveWith at least four lock-six hybrids, Robin McBryde’s forward pack has more flexibility than a circus contortionist, which they’ll need to beat the Springbok locks in the lineout battle.Maro Itoje and Alun Wyn Jones are the presumptive Test starters at second row but for all of their angelic transcendence, neither runs their country’s lineout.Alun Wyn Jones and Maro Itoje compete at a lineout (AFP/Getty Images)But fear not – every other second-row/blindside option is a lineout nause, with Iain Henderson, Tadhg Beirne and Courtney Lawes all Thunderbirds in the air, and Jonny Hill the mastermind of the Exeter set-piece.With each No 8 also a willing jumper, this might have doomed Billy Vunipola’s case. In the trusty form of Jamie George and Ken Owens, Gatland has selected his steadiest set-piece hookers. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS No fairytale for Kyle SincklerThe biggest surprise of the Lions squad announcement came just after Jason Leonard read out the name of Sam Simmonds. This is no reflection on the Exeter man’s ability or inclusion but was because the next name on the list was not Kyle Sinckler.Sinckler was one of the breakout stars of the 2017 tour. At the time on the fringes of England’s squad, he beat out national team-mate Dan Cole for the replacement tighthead spot in the Tests, riding that wave of form to a starting berth in the World Cup final.Of course, that’s where the story ended, with Sinckler forced off in the first five minutes. However, with the possibility of a triumphant rematch against the Springboks looming, the fairytale seemed back on track, with the fanfare of a good old-fashioned battle against Tadhg Furlong for the Test tighthead shirt awaiting.Perhaps fairytales are special because they rarely happen. Or maybe they already exist in this Lions squad. Watch Rory Sutherland’s reaction to being selected after an adductor injury left him in a wheelchair and doubting his rugby future. Jacob Whitehead picks out the learnings from Warren Gatland’s 37-man touring party Robbie Henshaw and Bundee Aki combine to test England in the Six Nations (Sportsfile/Getty Images) last_img read more

El proceso canónico prescribe un método para ponerle fin a…

first_img Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY center_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET El proceso canónico prescribe un método para ponerle fin a la relación episcopal. [Episcopal News Service] Los obispos y diputados que acudieron a Indianápolis en julio para la 77ª. reunión de la Convención General hicieron una declaración histórica respecto a la relación entre los obispos y las diócesis, reconociendo que, en raras ocasiones, esa relación se torna en extremo tirante, a veces hasta el punto de la ruptura.La declaración, hecha por medio de la Resolución B021, establece un proceso canónico para reconciliar o disolver la relación episcopal.La Resolución B021 fue el resultado de un llamado (vía la Resolución B014) de la reunión de la Convención General en 2009 a buscar una vía para ayudar a las diócesis y los obispos a resolver sus diferencias.“La Iglesia Episcopal es relativamente única en que no hay ningún mecanismo pastoral o canónico para la intervención de la Iglesia en general a fin de llevar la reconciliación o la disolución dentro de una diócesis con conflictos”, advertía la Resolución B014 en su explicación. El costo de esa carencia es “enorme”, decía la explicación, y se manifiesta en la forma de “obispos y sus familias que viven estigmatizados y sin la gratitud y el cuidado de las diócesis a las que han servido, miembros de comités permanentes agotados y maltratados, diócesis que se han quedado desmoralizadas y divididas por las facciones, y el nombre de la Iglesia con frecuencia se ve comprometido por la ausencia de un proceso más humano”.“Varias diócesis han experimentado una continua enemistad entre los obispos y sus cuerpos eclesiásticos fundamentales, situación que a veces ha durado años, y a veces décadas”, también hacia notar la explicación.El proceso aprobado por esta reunión de la Convención en la B021 es semejante al mecanismo para una parroquia que se encuentre en un grave conflicto con su rector (Título III.9.12-13). Al canon del Título III, “De la vida y obra de un obispo”, se le añadirá la política de la Iglesia respecto al ministerio ordenado. La adición entrará en vigor el 1 de septiembre.Se aplicará, según lo que se convertirá en la Sección 9 de ese canon, cuando la relación entre una diócesis y su obispo, el obispo coadjutor o sufragáneo esté “en peligro por desacuerdo o disensión” hasta el punto en que el obispo, dos tercios del Comité Permanente o dos tercios de un voto mayoritario de la Convención Diocesana consideren que los problemas son lo bastante graves para invocar el proceso.“Mi opinión es que la aplicación de este canon será rara, pero en casos donde pudiera ser necesario, podría ayudar a librar de daño indebido a una diócesis y a la relación episcopal”, dijo Mark Hollingsworth, obispo de la Diócesis de Ohio, quien propuso la B021, en una reciente entrevista con el Servicio de Prensa Episcopal (ENS). “Es más probable que, el contar con el canon, incentivará una resolución más rápida antes de tener que invocarlo”.Si una diócesis y un obispo deciden invocar el canon, tal decisión le permite a cualquiera de las partes pedirle al obispo primado que intervenga y ayude a resolver el desacuerdo o la disensión. El obispo primado entonces comienza un proceso —que incluye la posible utilización de un consultor o un mediador diplomado —con el propósito de propiciar la reconciliación. Si las partes convienen en reconciliarse, deben definir la “responsabilidad del obispo y de la diócesis”, según la nueva Sección 9.Además, el obispo, o dos tercios del Comité Permanente, o la votación de una mayoría de dos tercios de la Convención Diocesana, pueden comenzar un proceso para disolver la relación episcopal. Las razones para la disolución deben ser presentadas por escrito al obispo primado, junto con un informe de cualquier mediador o consultor que pudiera haber intervenido. Esa notificación pone en marcha una serie de medidas [cuya aplicación] sería cuestión de meses. El obispo primado puede requerir ulteriores intentos de mediación y reconciliación.Si no hubiere ninguna resolución, un comité de un obispo (nombrado por el obispo primado) y un sacerdote y un laico (nombrado por el presidente de la Cámara de Diputados) de fuera de la diócesis ha de reunirse para recomendar una resolución del asunto. El comité podría recomendar que la relación episcopal continúe o que debe disolverse.La recomendación tendría que ser aprobada por dos tercios de los miembros de la Cámara de Obispos presentes y con derecho a voto en la próxima reunión regular o especial de la Cámara. Si esa mayoría no la aprueba, el comité tendría que recomendar otra resolución a la misma reunión, que tendría que someterse a votación en esa reunión.“En lo tocante al tiempo de la Iglesia, esta cosa se mueve a la velocidad del rayo”, dijo recientemente a ENS el Rdo. Ledlie I. Laughlin, diputado por Pensilvania y presidente del Comité Permanente de esa diócesis.Laughlin, que es el rector de la iglesia de San Pedro [St. Peter’s] en Filadelfia, dijo que él siguió la formulación del proceso que finalmente se aprobó “y lo invitaron a participar en algunas de las conversaciones mientras se hacían correcciones sobre la marcha”.El proceso expuesto en la versión de la B021 que la Convención aprobara no es el mismo con el cual la resolución comenzó y es también diferente del propuesto en la A065 por la Comisión Permanente sobre Desarrollo del Ministerio, también en respuesta a la B014.Hollingsworth dijo que él y el obispo Mark Sisk, de la Diócesis de Nueva York, redactaron la versión original de la B021 luego que un equipo de trabajo de Desarrollo del Ministerio presentara su propuesta del proceso para la reconciliación o la disolución de una relación episcopal a la reunión de la Cámara de Obispos en la primavera de 2012. La propuesta se hacía eco de la que ya existe para [las relaciones] de una parroquia y su rector.“Creo que todo el mundo pensó que era un trabajo excelente”, dijo Hollingsworth, refiriéndose al proceso del equipo de trabajo,  pero “la inquietud era que fuera un proceso complejo y el temor de que pudiera tomar mucho tiempo y resultar costoso”.Hollingsworth dijo también que él y Sisk  habían pensado en un proceso más racionalizado y presentaron un borrador a sus colegas durante la misma reunión. Obtuvieron el visto bueno para proseguir la labor y de este modo los dos refinaron su propuesta. Ellos, junto con Thomas Shaw, obispo de la Diócesis de Massachusetts, la presentaron a la Convención General.Una vez en Indianápolis, explicó Hollingsworth, el Comité [legislativo] sobre el Ministerio le pidió a un grupo de obispos y “a algunas otras personas interesadas” que intentaran formular una resolución para reemplazar la A065 y la B021. Ese grupo “fundamentalmente presentó una resolución que, como grupo, creímos que satisfacía las esperanzas de todos los participantes del proceso, incluidos los clérigos y los laicos, y resultó tan expedito y eficiente como pudimos hacerlo”, agregó.La medida pasó a la Cámara de Obispos el 10 de julio donde los miembros cambiaron la mayoría de votos necesarios a través del proceso a un margen de dos tercios.“La preocupación que algunos obispos expresaron fue que un problema de esta gravedad debía exigir una súper mayoría”, dijo Hollingsworth a ENS. “Sentí que una mayoría simple no era suficiente, pero obviamente la mayoría de la cámara creyó que estas decisiones requerían de una súper mayoría”.La Cámara de Diputados estuvo de acuerdo con la versión enmendada de la B021 el último día de la Convención. Hubo alguna animación en un momento del debate de ese día cuando los diputados convinieron en limitar su comentario sobre las resoluciones. Sin embargo, después del voto de la Cámara, Laughlin, de la Diócesis de Pensilvania, pidió intervenir un momento a título de privilegio personal para agradecerles a sus colegas sus oraciones y “apoyo por nosotros para ocuparnos de los divisivos problemas que hemos estado confrontando con nuestro obispo”.El Comité Permanente de Pensilvania ha estado en pugna con el obispo Charles Bennison desde mediados de la pasada década por inquietudes respecto a cómo él maneja los activos de la diócesis y otros asuntos.Más de una vez el Comité Permanente ha pedido la renuncia de Bennison, incluido el día en que él regreso a trabajar en agosto de 2010 luego de la el Tribunal de Revisión para el Proceso de un Obispo revocó un fallo de un tribunal inferior de la Iglesia que dictaminó su deposición del ministerio por haber incurrido en una conducta impropia de un miembro del clero. El tribunal de revisión convino con uno de los dos fallos de conducta impropia del tribunal inferior, pero dijo que Bennison no podía ser depuesto porque el cargo estaba restringido por el estatuto de limitaciones de la Iglesia.En septiembre de 2010, el Comité Permanente le pidió a la Cámara de Obispos su “apoyo y ayuda” para obtener la jubilación o la renuncia de Bennison.  Posteriormente ese mes los obispos pidieron la “renuncia inmediata e incondicional” de Bennison. Al día siguiente, Bennison rehusó. Él sigue siendo el obispo diocesano.Hollingsworth hizo notar que el proceso que la Convención General le añadió al Título III no tiene por objeto reemplazar el uso de los cánones disciplinarios de la Iglesia para clérigos y obispos conocido como Título IV. Esa serie de cánones enumera las normas de conducta para el clero y bosqueja un proceso para el manejo de las acusaciones de los clérigos que violen esas normas. Durante cierto número de años, los cánones del Título III han reconocido que los rectores y sus parroquias pueden encontrarse en conflicto por razones que no sean violaciones de conducta. No había ningún reconocimiento canónico de que surgiera esa posibilidad en la relación entre un obispo y una diócesis hasta la medida tomada recientemente por la Convención.“Si hay ofensas contempladas en el Título IV, entonces debe seguirse [lo prescrito por] ese título”,  dijo Hollingsworth. “En ausencia de un proceso efectivo para abordar una relación comprometida entre un obispo y una diócesis, la única otra ruta podría ser encontrar un modo de abordarla inadecuadamente a través del Título IV, y eso no ayuda a la diócesis, ni a la Iglesia ni al obispo”.Laughlin le dijo a ENS que el Comité Permanente discutió el nuevo proceso canónico durante una reunión regular luego de la Convención General, pero que no había llegado a tomarse ninguna decisión.Agregó que resultaba claro a partir de sus conversaciones con los promotores del proceso que éstos “se mostraron cuidadosos de no relacionarlo demasiado estrechamente con la situación en la Diócesis de Pensilvania”.El proceso se concentra en “nuestra relaciones los unos con los otros en el cuerpo de Cristo y respecto a cómo mantener ese cuerpo sano, y como nos mantenemos mutuamente responsables”, dijo Laughlin.“Es un reconocimiento de que a veces esas relaciones se rompen, o ya no son mutuamente benéficas y como tales ya no sirven a la misión de la Iglesia y a la proclamación del evangelio”, agregó. “El canon ofrece un medio para que las partes [en conflicto] aborden esos problemas de manera que puedan resolverlos y seguir adelante con el ministerio vital al que somos llamados”.Entre tanto, otro método que se ha sugerido para ayudar a las diócesis y a sus obispos a discernir juntos el futuro —un método que habría significado una desviación aún mayor de la forma tradicional de esa relación— nunca se presentó en el mismo comité de la Convención General que discutió las [resoluciones] A053 y B021.El Rdo. Alex Dyer, de Connecticut, propuso en la Resolución D041 fijar en nueve años el período [de gobierno] de un obispo diocesano. El período podría renovarse un número ilimitado de veces por una votación de la convención diocesana. Un obispo habría conservado sus órdenes episcopales si la diócesis decidiera ponerle término a la relación.Dyer le dijo a ENS que a él le gustaba el enfoque de la Iglesia Evangélica Luterana en América, en la cual se eligen los obispos por períodos renovables de seis años, y que su propuesta “no pretendía tan sólo deshacerse de un obispo”. Por el contrario, habría sido una oportunidad de “detenerse y mirar, y ver si esta [relación] es algo bueno”.“Es ciertamente un criterio mutuo”, afirmó Dyer. “No se trata de aprobaciones o rechazos”.Él sugirió que el último año de un período podría usarse para una revisión mutua del ministerio que podría terminar en una votación para renovar [ese ministerio] o para “una amable despedida”.“Debemos reevaluar constantemente nuestra eficacia en servir a la misión de Dios”, dijo. “Jesús no fue demasiado autocomplaciente”.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera del Servicio de Prensa Episcopal. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Aug 24, 2012 Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Releaselast_img read more

Zimbabwe Anglicans threatened by chain-wielding thugs

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Africa, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI [Anglican Communion News Service] Reclaiming church properties has not been as easy as Anglicans in Zimbabwe had hoped with those trying to do so being refused entry and beaten with chains.Writing to supporters around the Anglican Communion, Diocese of Harare Bishop Chad Gandiya said that, despite a Supreme Court order recognizing the cathedral as belonging to the diocese, excommunicated bishop, Nolbert Kunonga, “did not leave willingly.”“Yesterday Kunonga was evicted from the diocesan offices and cathedral,” he wrote. “He refused to handover three diocesan cars in his possession. He came back later with thugs with chains who started chasing people beating some (some of the guards we had hired were beaten).“When our people reported it to the police they were shunted from one office to the other because the police said, “they were too junior to deal with the Anglican matter.” Eventually they were served and riot police were sent who arrested some of the thugs and we are grateful for that.“Kunonga himself threatened to shoot a journalist! The thugs were drinking the potent Mozambican beer called “Zed” in the cathedral cloisters.”Eventually, members of the Diocese of Harare, part of the Church of the Province of Central Africa, did take possession of the diocesan offices and the cathedral.The morning of Nov. 29, the police initially tried to prevent Gandiya and other Anglicans from holding a service in the cathedral, but they were eventually allowed in. Thanks to the use of social media, many people turned out to worship in the cathedral – the first service held there since Kunonga and his followers claimed the building for themselves.There are still concerns about evictions that were supposed to be carried out Nov. 29 that have been halted.“We don’t know by who and why,” Gandiya wrote. “These are sad developments when we were prepared to move on. Preparations for our Thanksgiving service on the 16th December are going on ahead as planned. It’s not over yet. Please continue to pray for us.”The Facebook page of the Diocese of Harare has been buzzing with comments and photos about congregations returning to their churches and some of the opposition faced by returning Anglicans. Comments (1) Rector Collierville, TN Anglican Communion Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA By ACNS staffPosted Nov 29, 2012 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA November 29, 2012 at 5:30 am Deliberately allowing “chain- wielding thugs” beat guards and drink beer in the house of the LORD is immoral. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Zimbabwe Anglicans threatened by chain-wielding thugs Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Comments are closed. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Tags Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Henry Musikavanhu says: last_img read more

Philippines: News and resources from Episcopal Relief & Development

first_img The Ven. Reese Rickards says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Joseph Mazza says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Your donation to the Philippines Fund will enable Episcopal Relief & Development to support the Episcopal Church in the Philippines as they respond to Super Typhoon Haiyan.11/15: Episcopal Church in the Philippines Active in Ecumenical Relief Efforts11/13: Statement from Prime Bishop Malecdan of the Episcopal Church in the Philippines11/12: Partners in the Philippines mobilizing volunteers to distribute relief supplies11/11: Understanding the 3 Rs of disasters: Taking the long view on disaster recovery11/11: Episcopal Church in the Philippines working with ecumenical partners11/10: Update as scope of disaster becomes known11/8: Reaching out to partners as they weather Super Typhoon Haiyan Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing November 15, 2013 at 6:59 pm I just gave a donation through ERD as they have a direct connection to the Episcopal Bishop in the Philippines, which I trust my $ going for the greatest good. I never worry about other nations giving. I follow the model of Jesus in the New Testament. He always was actively doing healing and giving guidance and His odds were much greater than ours today. November 15, 2013In the week following Super Typhoon Haiyan’s impact on November 8, the National Council of Churches in the Philippines (NCCP) engaged its member churches, including the Episcopal Church in the Philippines, to mobilize youth volunteers for Operation Paglingap (“caring” in Tagalog).So far, the combined effort has produced 6,000 family food packs containing a week’s worth of basic supplies such as rice, fish and cooking oil.  The supplies were purchased in Manila with local and international funds, and an additional 5,000 food packs are currently in assembly.Food and water are being distributed from Catbalogan, a city on the island of Samar, where Haiyan first made landfall.  Supply delivery is slowly progressing via truck and ferry, and NCCP staff are working with government and ecumenical partners to coordinate distribution to families in need.  Member church presence in rural communities will greatly help in expanding the reach of relief supplies.Assessments are currently underway that will inform ongoing response efforts, including the relocation of displaced persons and pastoral care for those who have lost loved ones.November 13, 2013The Most Reverend Edward P. Malecdan, Prime Bishop of the Episcopal Church in the Philippines, has released the following statement regarding the church’s response to Super Typhoon Haiyan, known locally as Yolanda:A STATEMENT FROM THE ECP PRIME BISHOP ON SUPER TYPHOON YOLANDAThe Episcopal Church in the Philippines continues to offer prayers for our brothers and sisters in the central part of our country whose lives were tragically lost and broken in the ferocious path of a super typhoon that came a month after a killer earthquake also brought death and destruction in the same region. We grieve for and with them as we continue to implore Divine comfort upon all who bear the pain of such a catastrophic experience.To all our constituents, let our communities and local churches be centers of prayerful solidarity and an assurance of our love,  thoughts and hopes for our suffering brothers and sisters. Let us individually and collectively take every positive effort to contribute to the massive relief undertaking. We are now working in coordination with the National Council of Churches in the Philippines for our participation in the relief work. We also affirm and support the initiatives of our Dioceses of Davao and Central Philippines as they minister to our constituents in the affected areas.To our partners, we acknowledge and express our gratitude for your thoughts, prayers and support. We appeal for your continuing solidarity as we all join hands in rising up from the unimaginable devastation of our land.THE MOST REV. EDWARD P. MALECDANPrime BishopEpiscopal Church in the Philippines November 12, 2013The Episcopal Church in the Philippines is currently mobilizing volunteers, particularly youth, to collect and distribute relief supplies such as food, water and other necessities. Church buildings that were not heavily damaged by Haiyan are being used as centers of operation. These activities are part of a larger ecumenical effort being coordinated by the National Council of Churches in the Philippines. Transportation difficulties continue to pose a significant obstacle to rescue and relief work, with many areas still only accessible by military aircraft.November 11, 2013Director of Engagement Sean McConnell writes about the three Rs of disaster response – Rescue, Relief and Recovery – and how Episcopal Relief & Development’s partnership methodology positions the organization to have the greatest long-term impact.November 11, 2013Episcopal Relief & Development has been in contact with its local partner, the Episcopal Church in the Philippines, in the aftermath of Super Typhoon Haiyan.  The storm made landfall in the central Philippines on the morning of November 8, causing widespread damage and disabling power and communications lines.  Rescue and relief efforts are reportedly being hampered due to roads being clogged with debris.The Episcopal Church in the Philippines is working with the National Council of Churches in the Philippines, an ecumenical group of which it is a member, to develop a coordinated response strategy.  Episcopal Relief & Development plans to offer technical and financial assistance to aid these efforts.“Our prayers are with all who were impacted by this storm,” said Abagail Nelson, Episcopal Relief & Development’s Senior Vice President for Programs.  “We will continue to be in touch with our partners at the Episcopal Church in the Philippines to support them as they work with their colleague churches to determine how best to respond in this time of crisis.”The National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council of the Philippines reported on the evening of November 10 that an estimated 9.5 million people across 41 provinces were affected by the storm, with 630,000 displaced and served both inside and outside the 1,645 active evacuation centers.  The report also estimates the number of damaged houses at just under 20,000.High winds approaching tornado-like speeds caused significant damage as the storm swept across the country, producing storm surges up to 20 feet high in coastal areas and sending waves of water more than half a mile inland.The typhoon weakened as it crossed the South China Sea to make landfall in Vietnam on the morning of November 11, and was downgraded to a tropical storm as it entered southern China later in the day.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori offered the following prayer for the people of the Philippines:O God our help in time of trouble, we pray for the Filipino people who have suffered this grievous natural disaster. We pray that survivors may find water, food, and shelter, and news of their missing loved ones. There is trauma and destruction in many places, and little news from some of the areas hardest hit. Give peace and confidence, O Lord, to those in the midst of the whirlwind. Open hearts and hands around the world to respond sacrificially to the urgent need. Help us to remember that we are connected, one to another, the living to the dead, the comfortable to the suffering, the peaceful to the worried and anxious. Motivate us to change our hearts, for our misuse and pollution of the earth you have given us to share has something to do with this disaster.  Show us your suffering Son in the midst of this Calvary, that we might love one another as he has loved us.  In your holy name we pray.  Amen.Earlier in the day, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby sent a message of prayer and solidarity.  According to ACNS, “[t]he Archbishop said the Church is praying for those who are ‘most vulnerable in this crisis’ – children separated from their parents, the sick and injured, the disabled and the elderly – and will ‘stand beside the people of the Philippines’.”Your donation to the Philippines Fund will enable Episcopal Relief & Development to support the Episcopal Church in the Philippines as they respond to Super Typhoon Haiyan.November 10, 2013As local authorities continue assessments and communications lines are restored, the scope of the impact of Super Typhoon Haiyan is becoming known.The New York Times reports: “The typhoon left Tacloban in ruins, as a storm surge as high as 13 feet overwhelmed its streets, with reports from the scene saying that most of the houses had been damaged or destroyed in the city of 220,000. More than 300 bodies have already been recovered, said Tecson John S. Lim, the city administrator, adding that the toll could reach 10,000 in Tacloban alone.”Please continue to pray for all who were impacted by the storm, and for those working to save lives and restore safety and security.November 8, 2013Episcopal Relief & Development has reached out to its partners in the Philippines, as Super Typhoon Haiyan made landfall in the central part of the country on the morning of November 8.According to reports, Haiyan is the strongest typhoon this year and may be one of the strongest in history, with winds that peaked at 195 miles per hour.  The impact of the storm caused flash flooding, mudslides and 30-foot storm surges, and knocked out power and communications networks in several provinces.At this early point in the storm, three deaths have been confirmed and seven injuries reported.  As many as one million people fled to safer areas, with some 125,000 taking refuge in evacuation centers.  Authorities had warned earlier that approximately 12 million people were at risk due to the storm.Among those most at risk were the estimated 270,000 people who had been residing in tents and other makeshift shelters following the 7.2-magnitude earthquake that struck the central Philippines on October 15, killing 222 people.“Our partner, the Episcopal Church in the Philippines, has done excellent work in the area of disaster risk reduction over the past few years, but when events come one on top of the other like this, challenges are compounded,” said Abagail Nelson, Episcopal Relief & Development’s Senior Vice President for Programs.  “We are standing ready to offer assistance as the local Church assesses needs and identifies areas where it can best help vulnerable people in this difficult time.”Please pray for the Church in the Philippines and for all those affected by Super Typhoon Haiyan.Your donation to the Philippines Fund will enable Episcopal Relief & Development to support the Episcopal Church in the Philippines as they respond to Super Typhoon Haiyan. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Shreveport, LA Comments are closed. November 12, 2013 at 8:04 am Oh Mr. Thewalt, you have missed the point of providing aid to our sisters and brothers and our children in the Philippines. Christians have a need to give. If others never feel the need then so be it. Let us thank God the Administration needs to send its Navy ships and Marines to provide aid to those devastated people. I hope that if you haven’t already you’ll send a generous check to Episcopal Relief and Development because your need to give is present, also. Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Anne Cohen says: Rector Washington, DC November 13, 2013 at 4:20 pm For the record, several nations in the world helped United States when Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast a few years ago including India and Bangladesh. However, our help of people in need should not be based on how other nations respond in times of our need. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Relief & Development In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis F WILLIAM THEWALT says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service November 12, 2013 at 9:33 am Keep us informed of the perspective of the Church as this disaster develops. ERD is a great people to people way for us to respond when we know channels are open again. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments (6) Posted Nov 15, 2013 People stand among debris and ruins of houses destroyed after Super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city in central Philippines November 10, 2013. Haiyan, one of the most powerful storms ever recorded killed at least 10,000 people in the central Philippines province of Leyte, a senior police official said on Sunday, with coastal towns and the regional capital devastated by huge waves. Super typhoon Haiyan destroyed about 70 to 80 percent of the area in its path as it tore through the province on Friday, said chief superintendent Elmer Soria, a regional police director. Photo: REUTERS/Erik De Castro[Episcopal Relief and Development] On the morning of November 8, 2013, Super Typhoon Haiyan made landfall in the central Philippines, causing widespread damage and knocking out power and communications lines.  Episcopal Relief & Development’s local partner, the Episcopal Church in the Philippines, is assessing needs and determining how best to respond.center_img Koshy Mathews says: Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK November 11, 2013 at 8:31 pm Where’s the aid from Russia, Germany, France, Saudi Arabia? All have financial resources near that of the U.S. but they do nothing. Why does the U. S. have to go it alone in providing disaster relief? Who helps the U. S. when disaster strikes? Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bulletin Insertshalf page (PDF) (JPG)full page (PDF) (JPG) Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Philippines: News and resources from Episcopal Relief & Development Super Typhoon Haiyan leaves devastating path of destruction Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Asia, November 13, 2013 at 11:18 am It is important to pray for these people as well as sending money to ERD. Sending goods is a poor idea because it overwhelms the people on the ground. They do not have the time or space to sort goods, many of them not needed. Sending money helps to buy what is needed the most. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Wanda Bryan says: Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more