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Praise for new isiZulu paper

first_imgA Sunday Times isiZulu edition will hit the streets on 7 November. (Image: Bongani Nkosi)The Pan South African Language Board (PanSALB) has applauded Sunday Times’ decision to publish versions in isiZulu to promote wider use of the country’s other official languages.Sunday Times, a national weekly newspaper owned by Avusa Media, will print and sell the isiZulu edition in KwaZulu-Natal province from 7 November 2010. The 32-page broadsheet will be called the Sunday Times Zulu Edition.“PanSALB believes that the idea will encourage other national media houses and other organisations to recognise the role of official languages in the country,” the organisation’s spokesperson Sibusiso Nkosi said in a statement on 3 November.“This announcement deserves praise and our support,” Nkosi added.The Sunday Times Zulu Edition is a critical development that will “help in the preservation and promotion of our indigenous languages”, PanSALB said.Breaking into the marketSunday Times is hoping to penetrate the isiZulu readership market that’s currently dominated by Ilanga, Ilanga langeSonto, Isolezwe and Isolezwe ngeSonto. These newspapers are among the highest sellers in the country, although they are only distributed in KwaZulu-Natal and some parts of Gauteng.Isolezwe ngeSonto, the Sunday publication launched in 2008, recorded a 34% sales hike in the first quarter of 2010, selling about 71 219 copies a week – according to its owners, Independent Newspapers.Sunday Times said the new publication came about after market research, which indicated that there’s high demand for an additional isiZulu newspaper.Sunday Times Zulu Edition will have a strong focus on provincial politics, municipal developments, celebrity news and sport. It will sell for R8 (US$1.17), which is cheaper than the Sunday Times English version.Sunday Times’ KwaZulu-Natal bureau, where staff will be based, has been thoroughly prepared for the new venture. “We have already had several dry runs with a team of sub-editors translating stories and laying them out with Zulu headlines, said Sunday Times editor Ray Hartley in a statement.“We have established an operation dedicated to serving this edition in our KwaZulu-Natal bureau,” he added.The paper will be run by Avusa Media editor-in-chief Mondli Makhanya, also former Sunday Times editor, until a new one starts in January 2011.Preserving indigenous languagesEnglish remains the dominant language in South African print media. Of the 10 other official languages, it’s only isiZulu and Afrikaans that have a presence in mainstream newspapers. The other official languages of the country are siSwati, isiXhosa, Sesotho, Setswana, isiNdebele, Xitsonga, Tshivenda and SePedi.PanSALB, a government organisation, is advocating for newspapers to be published in these languages as well to promote their usage. “We hope that in future, such efforts [like Sunday Times’] will be extended to other languages … ” said Nkosi.IsiZulu is the most widely spoken language in South Africa after English. According to PanSALB, it’s the home language of about 24% of South Africans, while about 50% of the country’s population understands it.Makhanya believes the venture will “play a positive role” in improving South Africans’ access to information.He sees the paper as Avusa’s way of developing the use of isiZulu. “We are extremely proud to be making a contribution to the growth of an indigenous language. This in no small way contributes towards us living up to our claim as ‘The paper for the people’.”The Pan South African Language Board (PanSALB) has applauded Sunday Times’ decision to publish versions in isiZulu to promote wider use of the country’s other official languages.Sunday Times, a national weekly newspaper owned by Avusa Media, will print and sell the isiZulu edition in KwaZulu-Natal province from 7 November 2010. The 32-page broadsheet will be called the Sunday Times Zulu Edition.“PanSALB believes that the idea will encourage other national media houses and other organisations to recognise the role of official languages in the country,” the organisation’s spokesperson Sibusiso Nkosi said in a statement on 3 November.“This announcement deserves praise and our support,” Nkosi added.The Sunday Times Zulu Edition is a critical development that will “help in the preservation and promotion of our indigenous languages”, PanSALB said.Breaking into the marketSunday Times is hoping to penetrate the isiZulu readership market that’s currently dominated by Ilanga, Ilanga langeSonto, Isolezwe and Isolezwe ngeSonto. These newspapers are among the highest sellers in the country, although they are only distributed in KwaZulu-Natal and some parts of Gauteng.Isolezwe ngeSonto, the Sunday publication launched in 2008, recorded a 34% sales hike in the first quarter of 2010, selling about 71 219 copies a week – according to its owners, Independent Newspapers.Sunday Times said the new publication came about after market research, which indicated that there’s high demand for an additional isiZulu newspaper.Sunday Times Zulu Edition will have a strong focus on provincial politics, municipal developments, celebrity news and sport. It will sell for R8 (US$1.17), which is cheaper than the Sunday Times English version.Sunday Times’ KwaZulu-Natal bureau, where staff will be based, has been thoroughly prepared for the new venture. “We have already had several dry runs with a team of sub-editors translating stories and laying them out with Zulu headlines, said Sunday Times editor Ray Hartley in a statement.“We have established an operation dedicated to serving this edition in our KwaZulu-Natal bureau,” he added.The paper will be run by Avusa Media editor-in-chief Mondli Makhanya, also former Sunday Times editor, until a new one starts in January 2011.Preserving indigenous languagesEnglish remains the dominant language in South African print media. Of the 10 other official languages, it’s only isiZulu and Afrikaans that have a presence in mainstream newspapers. The other official languages of the country are siSwati, isiXhosa, Sesotho, Setswana, isiNdebele, Xitsonga, Tshivenda and SePedi.PanSALB, a government organisation, is advocating for newspapers to be published in these languages as well to promote their usage. “We hope that in future, such efforts [like Sunday Times’] will be extended to other languages … ” said Nkosi.IsiZulu is the most widely spoken language in South Africa after English. According to PanSALB, it’s the home language of about 24% of South Africans, while about 50% of the country’s population understands it.Makhanya believes the venture will “play a positive role” in improving South Africans’ access to information.He sees the paper as Avusa’s way of developing the use of isiZulu. “We are extremely proud to be making a contribution to the growth of an indigenous language. This in no small way contributes towards us living up to our claim as ‘The paper for the people’.”last_img read more

AgriHUB helps small-scale KwaZulu-Natal farmers

first_imgThe Partner Farmer AgriHUB programme gives small-scale farmers help with developing their land, subsidises seed and seedling purchases and helps with selling produce.AgriHUB mentors help to train small scale farmers, but success is dependent on the effort they put in on their own plots. (Image: Partner Farmer AgriHUBS, Facebook)Sulaiman PhilipA drought in the US, the world’s biggest maize producer, affects food prices across the world. In a globalised agricultural economy, extreme weather conditions that destroy crops on one part of the planet cause food prices to spike in others, as supply drops.And as climate change activists warn of rising temperatures and increasing droughts and heat waves, securing reliable food supply is becoming more important.South Africa is a net importer of agricultural products so the price fluctuations on a bag of maize meal are due to weather conditions in the US maize belts.A pilot project in Umbumbulu, KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), funded in part by the eThekwini Municipality, is designed to reduce dependence on imported agricultural produce by helping small-scale farmers build commercially viable agri-businesses. The non-governmental organisation Newlands Mashu Community Development Centre developed and implements its Partner Farmer AgriHUB programme gives farmers help with developing their land, subsidises seed and seedling purchases and helps with selling produce.Subsistence to commercial farmingPaula Osborn, Partner Farmer project manager, joined the programme about eight months after it kicked off in September 2010.“The project is based on the open share principle. Anyone can become involved. We started with 50 small farmers. After the first few harvests we identify the most productive who we can help develop into commercial farmers. Developing from a subsistence farmer to one able to provide produce for your family and the market is dependent on your own efforts. The programme is designed to give farmers the tools to do that.”The community benefits from the harvest by buying fresh and healthy produce at lower rates. As the project has grown, farmers have been able to create jobs in a region where unemployment is entrenched.Theresa Mabhida, one of the 467 farmers in the Umbumbulu project, farms in Etsheni near Port Shepstone. “This project is doing away with unemployment and our healthy projects are curbing sickness,” she says. “My sense of self-worth is high. I wake up every day knowing I have something to do for myself and my community.”The farmers in the programme are trained to use organic methods to produce crops for local consumption. Soils managed with organic methods have better water-holding capacity and infiltration rates. They also produce higher yields during both droughts and an excess of rain.“The mentors we have at each project were trained at the Durban Botanic Gardens Permaculture Centre. They are trained in holistic, ecologically balanced permaculture farming methods.”The harvest includes vegetables such as spinach, beetroot, red onions, potatoes and avocado. In a good month Osborn estimates the farmers in Umbumbulu can harvest up to 10 tons of fresh produce based on the sales of seedlings and seeds supplied to farmers. Most of the harvest is sold to neighbours or used by the family, but one to two tons of that produce is sold to local restaurants and health food shops in KZN. What is not sold is packaged into “veggie boxes” that are sold to local schools, which sell them to students’ parents.‘This is real food’The farmers earn incomes through sales in their local communities and by selling excess to Partner Farmers, who pay close to retail prices. Schools earn an income as well. For Osborn there are two benefits to the system. “People are realising that saving is income. By purchasing local produce at reduced prices they are building wealth in the community. Second, parents tell us that kids who never eat vegetables are now chewing on fresh spinach leaves. Their bodies are telling them that these fresh organic vegetables are real food.”The programme’s success would be boosted if the yields could be accurately predicted. Ten tons of food is produced from 5 000 to 10 000 seedlings, but what is specifically available at harvest time is difficult to gauge. Mentors’ visits to the fields give an idea of the haul, but recording is manual, time-consuming and error-prone. The programme managers are developing a smartphone app to instantly record what has been planted and what is likely to be available at harvest.“If each farmer had a cell phone, and that is our hope, we could generate predictive reports that would allow us to sell the harvest before it left the field,” says Osborn.She believes that the programme in Umbumbulu will run at least until 2016 before the organisation feels comfortable handing the management, production, warehousing and distribution over to a farmers’ cooperative, while still providing mentorship where needed. Future programmes will run on average for just five years before handover.“Umbumbulu was the pilot; with the know-how and experience gained we can avoid mistakes made in the new projects we run.”Long-term fundingThe top-down funding system favoured by government and corporations does not work in agriculture, says Osborn. Agricultural projects need long-term funding, which does not fit in with government or business funding cycles. The Umbumbulu project, for example, will need funding for at least six years before Partner Farmers can hand the project over to the local community.“In Umbumbulu we would get municipal funding for six months because that fitted into their funding cycle, then no funding for three before funds were released again.”Now, with National Lottery funding and a five-year corporate sponsorship deal in place, Partner Farmers is able to fund day-to-day operations while the eThekwini municipality funds infrastructure development around two new projects.“Over the period of the project in Umbumbulu, and in our newer projects, we have demonstrated how the model works.”Including Umbumbulu (South Basin) there are three new projects to help small-scale KZN farmers; the Sterkspruit AgriHUB in Hammersdale-Shongweni in the outer west, and the Hambanathi-Greylands AgriHUB in in the north.As Osborn points out, “You start by building resilient self-sustaining communities. From there, you build a nation that can recover effectively from any setbacks.”Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Gilas Pilipinas joins Fiba Asia Champions Cup in China

first_imgLATEST STORIES MOST READ Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ View comments Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next San Beda cruises to 8th straight; Bolick ejected after scuffle Roger Pogoy. Photo from Fiba.comGilas Pilipinas is set to compete in the 2017 Fiba Asia Champions Cup which runs from Sept. 22-30 in Shenzen, China.National team coach Chot Reyes announced Gilas’ participation in the tournament Tuesday on his Twitter account.ADVERTISEMENT Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim “Breaking: Chooks-to-Go Pilipinas joins @FIBAAsiaCC. Games will be shown @TV5manila & @Sports5PH,” Reyes wrote.The tournament features some of Asia’s best club teams with China’s Xinjian Flying Tigers tipped to repeat as champions. The Flying Tigers will be led by naturalized Filipino Andray Blatche.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingGilas, which finished in seventh place in the Fiba Asia Cup last month, will use the competition as part of its buildup for the Fiba World Cup Qualifying in November. Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his sidelast_img read more

Present perfect of Rajasthan

first_imgFatehgarh Heritage Renaissance Resort in Udaipur uses wind and solar energyFew states of India are as evocative as Rajasthan–the very name conjures up images of medieval forts and flamboyant palaces, havelis and temples, castles on hilltops, picturesque villages and colourful fairs. Today, keeping with the times, Rajasthan’s heritage entrepreneurs are incorporating audio-tours, son et lumiore, alternative technologies for power generation or water harvesting. Nowhere is the change more apparent than in the cities of Udaipur, Jodhpur and Jaipur.Udaipur updateA cooking demonstration in progress at Deogarh MahalUdaipur has long been the epitome of Rajasthan’s romance since an island palace of the Maharanas was converted into the stunningly beautiful hotel with five-star trappings. One of the most exciting new heritage developments of Udaipur is Fatehgarh Heritage Renaissance Resort built from the remains of a demolished castle moved to the site from about 150 km away, supplemented with architectural fragments and doors from other heritage properties. Climb to the terrace and the glass-walled restaurant offers a breathtaking view of the lakes. There is much focus on eco and social conscious measures–an energy efficient design that makes the most of air movement and natural light, a wind turbine and solar panels that account for more than half the power consumption of the property, a water harvesting system inspired by medieval stepwell architecture, indigenous plantations to make a home for wildlife, local employment and a focus on using locally available materials. Vintage collections are still popular in the StateIf you are looking for a place to dine on a romantic night out, Udaipur is becoming known for those too–the Whistling Teal is a beautiful garden restaurant with a bar furnished with saddles and a coffee lounge; the park-like Ambrai has a view across the lake to the island palaces, the aptly named Sunset View Terrace in the City Palace complex, and the recently opened Raaj Bagh, which, as the name suggests, is done in colonial style with old dressers, antique furniture and vintage cars in a covered area.Like the properties, Udaipur’s shopping scene is also taking a modern twist–the Bougainvillaea Art Gallery showcases contemporary paintings, sculpture and artworks in aesthetically pleasing interiors with an ambience to match, Andraab is an attractive showroom recently opened for Kashmiri shawls and other handcrafted textile products, the trendy Ganesh Art Emporium, the Pristine Gallery, and galleries of individual artists.New entriesTraditional food is still popular in the StateAs you head up NH-8 from Udaipur towards Delhi, you come to one of Rajasthan’s most fairy-tale heritage hotels–Deogarh Mahal which rises from an elevation in the middle of a village with hill views from its terraces. The 50 rooms are imaginatively designed to match the character of the property. For something more exclusive, head for the owner’s four-suite Fort Seengh Sagar set amid shimmering waters. The decor is Rajasthani yet chic and minimalistic, with rooms having distinctive features–a fountain, a rockery, a temple, stone art and even a jacuzzi.Jodhpur jauntRamgarh Lodge near Jaipur is now a Gateway HotelStraight out of a storybook is Jodhpur’s Mehrangarh Fort, built in AD 1459. The new thing about the historical site is an audio-guided tour that will take you through the collections in the museum of princely memorabilia. At the end of the tour you come to the splendidly designed Museum Shop, which blends the fort’s old-world charm with contemporary visual merchandising to display art, artefacts, handicrafts, porcelain, jewellery, clothing and souvenirs. The display prompted an international magazine writer equalling the shop to being as good as an annexe of the New York’s Museum of Contemporary Art!Head from here to Raika Bagh and the Palace Road for Jodhpur’s superbly carpentered furniture, first-rate antique reproductions and handcrafted artefacts. There are some fun places to eat in this area–On-the-Rocks, as the name suggests, is a bar and restaurant in a rock garden along the imposing Ajit Bhawan Palace while Khaas Bagh has an arts and crafts gallery, a resort garden and a Bollywood themed dining area.A hidden gem in the city is MV Spice Shop in the Vegetable Market. The daughters of spice merchant, Mohanlal Verhomal, who was quite a legend among tourists, have come up with an extraordinarily innovative range of spice blends that they make at home from hand-ground spices. It is the place to buy anything from chai masala to a mutton curry mix.Jaipur goes contemporaryPolo tourism is catching up in the StateWhile Udaipur and Jodhpur remain old-worldly in their charm, Jaipur has burst out of its ‘Pink City’ shell with gleaming glass-and-steel shopping complexes, malls, supermarkets and multiplexes along its thoroughfare, Delhi-style plush new residential areas, and the ubiquitous CCDs, Baristas, fast food outlets and bars. But for visitors Jaipur is still about serious shopping. What is really exciting about shopping in Jaipur these days is the initiatives of the NGOs, cooperatives, self-help groups and artisanal families. A classic is Anokhi’s museum at the restored Chanwar Palkiwalon Ki haveli at Amber which won the UNESCO Asia-Pacific Heritage Conservation Award in 2000. Here you can watch craftsmen at work on block printing and woodcarving, learn about the history of block-printing besides experiencing the architecture of a haveli. It is just a few minutes away from Amber Fort, which now offers an audio-tour as well as a Sound and Light Show, with Gulzar’s words, Amitabh’s voice and music to match. Amber is also being given a makeover ahead of the forthcoming Commonwealth Games.The stylish showrooms of Anokhi and Fabindia in the city, the Soma on Jacob Road, the UN-supported Mojari which, as the name suggests, sells footwear from rural Rajasthan, and the blue pottery showroom called Kripal Kumbh, run by the daughters of the master ceramist Kripal Singh, are happening places to shop.Jaipur is also teeming with places to eat–from well-known names like Dasaprakash and Sankalp for South Indian food, Copper Chimney for North Indian, Little Italy, and so forth, to novel places like the Peacock Rooftop Restaurant or Om Tower Revolving Restaurant. Favourite evenings-out from Jaipur are village-theme restaurants like Chokhi Dhani, which also offers a range of folksy entertainments, an artisanal bazaar and camel and elephant rides.A couple of new options are also available for those who want to escape the city and yet not be too far from it. A good example of this is the Ramgarh Lodge, the former hunting lodge of the Maharajas of Jaipur, which is now a Gateway Hotel. And for a taste of something more energetic, get whisked away to Anokhi Farm outside Jaipur where you can learn the royal sport of polo. The training includes riding under supervision, stick-and-ball practice on wooden horses and practice chukkers.They say it’s just the beginning of modernisation. Let’s see what this year–the year of the Commonwealth Games in Delhi–spells for Rajasthan, its neighbour. advertisementadvertisement Fact fileFatehgarh–A Heritage Renaissance Resort Sisarma, Udaipur; tel: (0294) 241 3845Whistling Teal 103-Bhatiayani Chhohata, Udaipur; tel: 242 2067Ambrai Amet Haveli, Chandpole, Udaipur; tel: 243 1085Sunset View Terrace, City Palace Complex, UdaipurRaaj Bagh Fateh Sagar Lake, Udaipur; tel: 329 0228Bougainvillea Art Gallery Fatehsagar Lake, UdaipurAndraab New Fatehpura, Udaipur; tel: 242 3285Ganesh Art Emporium Jagdish Chowk, Udaipur; tel: 242 2864Pristine Gallery Bhattiyani Cohtta, Udaipur; tel: (0) 98291 84223Deogarh Mahal tel: (02904) 252 777; 253 333Fort Seengh Sagar Reservations through Deogarh MahalMehrangarh Fort Audio Tour Tel: (0291) 254 8790, 254 8992On-the-Rocks Circuit House Road, Jodhpur; tel: 251 0410Khaas Bagh Opp. Police Lines, Ratanada, Jodhpur; tel: 251 4513MV Spice Shop Clock Tower, Jodhpur; tel (0) 92520 00435;Anokhi Museum Amber Fort, Jaipur; tel: (0141) 253 0226Sound and Light Show at Amber Fort; 6.30 and 7.30p.m.Anokhi Jaipur; tel: 400 7244/45Fabindia MGF Mall, Jaipur; tel: 511 5997; Prithviraj Road; tel: 511 5992advertisementSoma 5 Jacob Road, Civil Lines, Jaipur; tel: 222 2778Mojari Vishwakarma Industrial Area, Jaipur; tel: 309 4260Kripal Kumbh Bani Park, Jaipur; tel: 220 1127Peacock Rooftop Restaurant Ajmer Road, Jaipur; tel: 237 3700Om Tower Revolving Restaurant MI Road, Jaipur; tel: 404 6666Chokhi Dhani Tonk Road, JaipurGateway Hotel Ramgarh Lodge One-hour drive from JaipurAnokhi Farm Tel: (01532) 275 0868last_img read more