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Praise for new isiZulu paper

first_imgA Sunday Times isiZulu edition will hit the streets on 7 November. (Image: Bongani Nkosi)The Pan South African Language Board (PanSALB) has applauded Sunday Times’ decision to publish versions in isiZulu to promote wider use of the country’s other official languages.Sunday Times, a national weekly newspaper owned by Avusa Media, will print and sell the isiZulu edition in KwaZulu-Natal province from 7 November 2010. The 32-page broadsheet will be called the Sunday Times Zulu Edition.“PanSALB believes that the idea will encourage other national media houses and other organisations to recognise the role of official languages in the country,” the organisation’s spokesperson Sibusiso Nkosi said in a statement on 3 November.“This announcement deserves praise and our support,” Nkosi added.The Sunday Times Zulu Edition is a critical development that will “help in the preservation and promotion of our indigenous languages”, PanSALB said.Breaking into the marketSunday Times is hoping to penetrate the isiZulu readership market that’s currently dominated by Ilanga, Ilanga langeSonto, Isolezwe and Isolezwe ngeSonto. These newspapers are among the highest sellers in the country, although they are only distributed in KwaZulu-Natal and some parts of Gauteng.Isolezwe ngeSonto, the Sunday publication launched in 2008, recorded a 34% sales hike in the first quarter of 2010, selling about 71 219 copies a week – according to its owners, Independent Newspapers.Sunday Times said the new publication came about after market research, which indicated that there’s high demand for an additional isiZulu newspaper.Sunday Times Zulu Edition will have a strong focus on provincial politics, municipal developments, celebrity news and sport. It will sell for R8 (US$1.17), which is cheaper than the Sunday Times English version.Sunday Times’ KwaZulu-Natal bureau, where staff will be based, has been thoroughly prepared for the new venture. “We have already had several dry runs with a team of sub-editors translating stories and laying them out with Zulu headlines, said Sunday Times editor Ray Hartley in a statement.“We have established an operation dedicated to serving this edition in our KwaZulu-Natal bureau,” he added.The paper will be run by Avusa Media editor-in-chief Mondli Makhanya, also former Sunday Times editor, until a new one starts in January 2011.Preserving indigenous languagesEnglish remains the dominant language in South African print media. Of the 10 other official languages, it’s only isiZulu and Afrikaans that have a presence in mainstream newspapers. The other official languages of the country are siSwati, isiXhosa, Sesotho, Setswana, isiNdebele, Xitsonga, Tshivenda and SePedi.PanSALB, a government organisation, is advocating for newspapers to be published in these languages as well to promote their usage. “We hope that in future, such efforts [like Sunday Times’] will be extended to other languages … ” said Nkosi.IsiZulu is the most widely spoken language in South Africa after English. According to PanSALB, it’s the home language of about 24% of South Africans, while about 50% of the country’s population understands it.Makhanya believes the venture will “play a positive role” in improving South Africans’ access to information.He sees the paper as Avusa’s way of developing the use of isiZulu. “We are extremely proud to be making a contribution to the growth of an indigenous language. This in no small way contributes towards us living up to our claim as ‘The paper for the people’.”The Pan South African Language Board (PanSALB) has applauded Sunday Times’ decision to publish versions in isiZulu to promote wider use of the country’s other official languages.Sunday Times, a national weekly newspaper owned by Avusa Media, will print and sell the isiZulu edition in KwaZulu-Natal province from 7 November 2010. The 32-page broadsheet will be called the Sunday Times Zulu Edition.“PanSALB believes that the idea will encourage other national media houses and other organisations to recognise the role of official languages in the country,” the organisation’s spokesperson Sibusiso Nkosi said in a statement on 3 November.“This announcement deserves praise and our support,” Nkosi added.The Sunday Times Zulu Edition is a critical development that will “help in the preservation and promotion of our indigenous languages”, PanSALB said.Breaking into the marketSunday Times is hoping to penetrate the isiZulu readership market that’s currently dominated by Ilanga, Ilanga langeSonto, Isolezwe and Isolezwe ngeSonto. These newspapers are among the highest sellers in the country, although they are only distributed in KwaZulu-Natal and some parts of Gauteng.Isolezwe ngeSonto, the Sunday publication launched in 2008, recorded a 34% sales hike in the first quarter of 2010, selling about 71 219 copies a week – according to its owners, Independent Newspapers.Sunday Times said the new publication came about after market research, which indicated that there’s high demand for an additional isiZulu newspaper.Sunday Times Zulu Edition will have a strong focus on provincial politics, municipal developments, celebrity news and sport. It will sell for R8 (US$1.17), which is cheaper than the Sunday Times English version.Sunday Times’ KwaZulu-Natal bureau, where staff will be based, has been thoroughly prepared for the new venture. “We have already had several dry runs with a team of sub-editors translating stories and laying them out with Zulu headlines, said Sunday Times editor Ray Hartley in a statement.“We have established an operation dedicated to serving this edition in our KwaZulu-Natal bureau,” he added.The paper will be run by Avusa Media editor-in-chief Mondli Makhanya, also former Sunday Times editor, until a new one starts in January 2011.Preserving indigenous languagesEnglish remains the dominant language in South African print media. Of the 10 other official languages, it’s only isiZulu and Afrikaans that have a presence in mainstream newspapers. The other official languages of the country are siSwati, isiXhosa, Sesotho, Setswana, isiNdebele, Xitsonga, Tshivenda and SePedi.PanSALB, a government organisation, is advocating for newspapers to be published in these languages as well to promote their usage. “We hope that in future, such efforts [like Sunday Times’] will be extended to other languages … ” said Nkosi.IsiZulu is the most widely spoken language in South Africa after English. According to PanSALB, it’s the home language of about 24% of South Africans, while about 50% of the country’s population understands it.Makhanya believes the venture will “play a positive role” in improving South Africans’ access to information.He sees the paper as Avusa’s way of developing the use of isiZulu. “We are extremely proud to be making a contribution to the growth of an indigenous language. This in no small way contributes towards us living up to our claim as ‘The paper for the people’.”last_img read more

Facebook Comments Have Been Around for a Year and Haven’t Taken Over Yet

first_imgmike melanson Tags:#Facebook#web Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Earlier today, everyone was talking about Facebook and how it is “planning to launch a third-party commenting system in a matter of weeks.” The only problem, of course, is that Facebook Comments already exists as a plug-in for third-party sites. Facebook confirmed that it is “testing an updated plugin” on both its Facebook Blog and Developer Blog, as it has been for the past year. In that time, all these other real-time comment startups, such as Echo and Livefyre, have had time to prepare for the arrival of the 600 million member strong social network in the commenting space. So far, Facebook hasn’t managed to take over the commenting space and they had a few points to offer on why that’s the case.“Facebook is planning to launch a third-party commenting system in a matter of weeks, according to multiple sources familiar with the new product,” writes CNET’s Caroline McCarthy. “This new technology could see Facebook as the engine behind the comments system on many high-profile blogs and other digital publications very soon.” Of course, if this were the case, why hasn’t this happened over the last year that Facebook has offered the product? McCarthy points to a rather old version of Facebook’s Comment plugin, saying that the “new commenting product is a significantly deeper expansion of this.” And if you look at either of the Facebook blogs mentioned above, you can see a newer version altogether. Take a look at a screenshot from last fall:According to Livefyre founder and CEO Jordan Kretchmer, Facebook entering the comment space is certainly “no surprise.”“We’ve been expecting it for some time,” said Kretchmer, “and have been actively building Livefyre towards the things that we know Facebook will get wrong. Namely: Identity, personas, open data, and non-discriminatory social media integration.”Chris Saad, VP of strategy at real-time commenting system Echo, mostly pointed to Echo’s upcoming launch event when we asked him how Echo had prepared for Facebook’s entrance into commenting, but also agreed that there were a number of areas he expected Facebook to fall short in. According to Saad, Facebook’s commenting system would likely not be real-time, wouldn’t allow for white labeling, wouldn’t allow any other party to own the data and would only allow for Facebook login. On this one point, at least, Facebook may change its tune – Peter Kafka tweeted today that the “new FB comment system [is] designed to work with Google, Yahoo, Twitter sign-ins, if [publication] wants them.”Beyond that, however, Kretchmer expanded on many of the contention points that both he and Saad expressed. “There will be very little or no shared ownership of comment data, and probably no plug and play database syncing for different CMS platforms. I’ve seen the rumors that Twitter and Google auth will be integrated, but my gut tells me that will require connecting those services back to your central Facebook account, which would defeat the purpose of allowing login through different social graphs in the first place. People generally want the option of commenting with different personas, not “anonymously” per se, but personas that they care about and upkeep in the different communities that they comment on. Not allowing for that will diminish the overall amount of conversation publishers will see. For example, I might have something meaningful to say about a controversial topic, but not something I want connected to my true identity.The other really important thing to note, is that larger publishers have their own login and profile systems in place. If Facebook comments doesn’t allow for any kind of Single Sign On with existing user systems (not just other social nets), I can see that being a big barrier for most. Publishers would basically be giving up their own communities to Facebook.”A quick look around the Internet also shows general user perception of a Facebook-only commenting system. People want to reserve the right to anonymity on the Internet and, if not this, then at least be able to exist as a separate persona from their true identity. Facebook can be credited for getting people to openly share this true identity on the Web, but they are still reluctant to use it all over the Web.What do you think – would you use a Facebook comment system on a third party site? Would you log in and leave a comment? Or would you shun the system and the site for other systems like Disqus, Echo or Livefyre?Let us know in our Disqus-powered comments below. Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro…center_img Related Posts The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

Katie Ledecky moving on after a bit of a letdown at worlds

first_imgView comments Ledecky failed to set a personal best in any of her races — the ultimate goal for every swimmer, even more than the medals. A runner-up finish in the 200-meter freestyle was the 20-year-old’s first individual defeat in a major international race.“I always wish there was more,” Ledecky said. “I’ve never walked away from a season completely satisfied, even last year (after winning four golds at the Rio Olympics). You always are looking and moving forward.”She was certainly due for a letdown.Ever since a stunning breakthrough at the 2012 London Olympics, when she won the 800 free as a little-known 15-year-old, Ledecky’s trajectory has been nothing but up, up, up.In 2013, she won four golds at the worlds in Barcelona, setting a pair of world records. Two years later in Kazan, she swept every freestyle from 200 to 1,500 meters, setting two more world records. And, yes, two more world records fell last summer in Brazil, transforming her into a full-fledged star.ADVERTISEMENT Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet But that wasn’t the only striking change in Ledecky’s life.After putting off college for a year to focus on the Olympics, the Washington, D.C.-area swimmer moved across the country for her freshman year at Stanford. It has been an enriching experience that she’s fully embraced, meeting new people and taking all sorts of challenging classes, but perhaps it had an impact on her swimming.Ledecky acknowledged that she “didn’t really set as high of goals or have that same motivation, just always being on and on and on.”“Going through a lot of transitions and changes this year, knowing that I’ve gone through that now, I can really take what I’ve learned and use it moving forward,” Ledecky said.She was certainly overshadowed along the banks of the Danube.Caeleb Dressel emerged as America’s newest sensation with a record-tying seven gold medals — three of them on the same night, the first swimmer ever to accomplish that feat at worlds.“He’s incredible,” Ledecky said, maybe even a bit relieved to have the spotlight shining elsewhere. “Just so impressive how he goes race to race to medal ceremony to medal ceremony, has another race in about two minutes. He’s just such a great athlete and such a great swimmer. So young, too, that he has so many great years ahead of him.”Dressel is the same age as Ledecky.Chances are, they both have plenty of great years ahead of them.But now, for perhaps the first time in her swimming career, Ledecky is facing a bit of a setback. FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES She won five gold medals. She took silver in her other event.“If that was my bad year for the next four years, then the next couple years are going to be pretty exciting,” Ledecky declared.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsBut her performance in Budapest did prove one thing.She’s human. National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games It will be interesting to see how she bounces back.In all likelihood, she’ll come back better than ever.“This year I didn’t really set very specific time goals or goals in general,” she said “I just kind of wanted to repeat in all by different events from the past two worlds and just play a part on some good Team USA relays. I didn’t really have too big of expectations for myself, especially compared to the last couple of years. I knew there were expectations externally, but I was really just trying to focus on my own races, putting those together, and using this year as a big learning year.”Ledecky took on her most demanding program at these championships, competing in four individual events and two relays, a total of 6,300 meters in all counting preliminaries, semifinals and finals.“It was pretty tiring,” she conceded. “I’m pretty wiped out right now. But I’m happy with how it all went. I was happy with how I was able to bounce back after each race, move forward to the next race and get through to the next round as well as I did.”She’s not totally pleased with the results, even though she’s now the winningest female swimmer in world championship history with 14 gold medals — more than anyone except Michael Phelps and Ryan Lochte.Ledecky feels like she’s capable of more.“I’m happy with five golds and a silver,” she said. “But there’s a lot of room for improvement for me, as crazy as that sounds. Moving forward, I’m going to be really motivated. I’m really looking forward to working toward 2020 now.”center_img Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Church, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plant Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next United States’ Katie Ledecky leaves the hall after winning the gold in the women’s 800-meter freestyle final during the swimming competitions of the World Aquatics Championships in Budapest, Hungary. APBUDAPEST, Hungary — OK, it wasn’t like Katie Ledecky was a flop at the world championships.Far from it.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ After historic 7 swim golds, Dressel to wrestle with math test DILG, PNP back suspension of classes during SEA Gameslast_img read more